Fall 2015

HIST 3051

Pandemics, Epidemics, and History

Christian W. McMillen

There is perhaps no longer lasting historical relationship than that between humans and disease, especially that of epidemic disease.  The relationship predates agriculture, the formation of cities, and, if current research on the emergence of diseases like tuberculosis is correct, human migration out of Africa.  From the earliest times to the present, epidemics have affected human history in myriad ways: demographically, culturally, politically, financially, and biologically.  Humans have never known a time in history when epidemics did not loom large.  This is true today as it ever was.  This course will span a great deal of time and space—from the emergence of the earliest known diseases through HIV/AIDS.  The course will be a mixture of lecture and discussion.  



Fall 2015

HIEA 1501 (1)

Introductory Seminar in East Asian History

"Thought and Religious Life in Imperial China"

Cong Ellen Zhang

This discussion-oriented class will explore the ideas and practices that shaped the political, intellectual, and religious life of imperial China. Major topics include early Chinese worldviews, the philosophies of the “Hundred Schools,” ideas of kingship and government, and institutional and popular religions. Required readings include Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy (ed. Philip J. Ivanhoe and Bryan W. Van Norden), selected Buddhist and Daoist scriptures, and a variety of popular literature. Final grades for the class will be based on a presentation, papers, and class participation. No prior knowledge of Chinese history is required. This course fulfills the College’s second writing and non-Western and historical perspective requirements.

 



Fall 2015

HIEA 3111

Chinese History to the Tenth Century

Cong Ellen Zhang

This class introduces Chinese history from the beginning through the end of the 10th century. Its goal is to explore what makes Chinese civilization specifically Chinese and how the set of values, practices, and institutions we associate with Chinese society came to exist. Political, social, cultural, and intellectual history will all be treated, though not equally for all periods. Major themes of the course include intellectual developments, empire-building efforts, religious and popular beliefs, and Chinese interaction with other cultures and peoples. Required reading includes a variety of primary sources, book chapters, and articles. Final grades will be based on four quizzes, a term paper, and a take-home final. This course fulfills the College’s non-Western and historical perspective requirements.



Fall 2015

HIUS 2001

American History, 1600-1865

Elizabeth Varon

This introductory survey course is designed both for prospective majors and non-majors. It will trace the relationships between social, economic, and religious change and the development of American political institutions. There will be two 75-minute lectures and a mandatory discussion section each week. The primary text for the course is Norton, et al., A People and a Nation, ninth edition. In addition, there will be supplementary readings from primary sources (sources written by figures in the past that describe their experiences or views). Readings will average 100 pages a week.  Grades will be based on class participation and on three written assignments: a midterm exam; an 8-10 page term paper; and a comprehensive, take-home final examination.



Fall 2015

HIUS 7621

Topics in United States Gender History

Elizabeth Varon

This colloquium will survey foundational and cutting-edge scholarship on the social construction of femininity and masculinity in U.S. history, from the colonial era to 1900.

We will explore how gender conventions take shape, and how they are perpetuated and contested.  Our readings represent a wide range of topics and methods:  they reconsider key events in women’s history such as the Salem witch trials and Seneca Falls convention; historicize such concepts as patriarchy, home, work, public and private; illustrate how gender history has enriched traditional fields such as political and military history; and place American gender conventions in a transnational and comparative perspective.



Fall 2015

HIUS 7621

Topics in United States Gender History

Elizabeth Varon

This colloquium will survey foundational and cutting-edge scholarship on the social construction of femininity and masculinity in U.S. history, from the colonial era to 1900.

We will explore how gender conventions take shape, and how they are perpetuated and contested.  Our readings represent a wide range of topics and methods:  they reconsider key events in women’s history such as the Salem witch trials and Seneca Falls convention; historicize such concepts as patriarchy, home, work, public and private; illustrate how gender history has enriched traditional fields such as political and military history; and place American gender conventions in a transnational and comparative perspective.



Fall 2015

HIUS 3281

History of Virginia 1607-1865

George H. Gilliam

This three-credit course looks at Virginia's social, political, and economic history from early colonization until the end of the Civil War. The class members will consider the following broad questions: (1) What did the various waves of settlers expect to find in Virginia, how did they prepare for the colonization, and what did they actually find and do once they arrived? (2) Why was the rise of an ideology of liberty and equality in Virginia accompanied by the rise of slavery? (3) How did wealthy planters and "common" people alike develop the radical political ideas that led them to revolution?  Did those groups share the same goals? (4) What role did Virginia government play in the pre-Civil War state economy? (5) What efforts did Virginians make to rid their state of slavery, and make the electorate as well as legislative representation more democratic, prior to the Civil War? (6) How did Virginians let themselves get drawn into the Civil War?

Readings will average about 100 pages per week, with slightly more early in the semester and slightly less later when students will devote substantial time to researching, writing, and re-writing a term paper. The readings will include ten chapters from Ronald L. Heinemann et als., Old Dominion, New Commonwealth: A History of Virginia 1607-2007; Edmund S. Morgan, American Slavery/American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia; T. H. Breen, Tobacco Culture: The Mentality of the Great Tidewater Planters on the Eve of Revolution; and selections from William W. Freehling, Showdown in Virginia: The 1861 Convention and the Fate of the Union. In addition, there may be several journal articles, and readings in primary source documents. (A final syllabus with greater specificity on required readings will be available by August 1, 2015.)

There will be a short-answer mid-term exam and an essay-type final exam. A major portion of each student's final grade will be determined by the instructor's evaluation of an 8-10 page term paper based on original research in primary source documents on a topic of the student's choice. Students will submit multiple drafts of the term paper during the final four weeks of the semester to obtain advice and guidance from the instructor.

The class will meet twice each week. At each meeting, about an hour will be devoted to lecture and the final 15 minutes will be devoted to guided class discussions of the readings and other material.

Cheryl Harris to deliver talk: "Race Declassified: Post-Racial Diversions”


American Forum - Black Leaders on Leadership - "What Now? Dialogues on Race and Turmoil in America"

Faculty: Phyllis Leffler

Black History Month tour of UVA




Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904



Contact:
tel: (434) 924-7147; fax: (434) 924-7891
office: M-F 8 am to 4:30 pm
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