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Middle East
Civil War
Founding Fathers

News

Is War Coming? Teach-in on U.S.-Iran Crisis

Is War Coming? Teach-in on U.S.-Iran Crisis

Date: Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Time: 5:00PM

Event Location: Nau Hall 101

On Wednesday, January 15th, Will Hitchcock and GAGE will host an interdisciplinary teach-in on the U.S.-Iran crisis.  Panelists include Philip Potter (Politics), Penny von Eschen (History), Farzaneh Milani, (MESALC), Jahan Ramazani (English), Fahad Bishara (History) and David Waldner (Politics). The teach-in will begin at 5 pm in Nau Hall 101. Please encourage your students to attend.

Date: Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Time: 5:00PM

Event Location: Nau Hall 101

Prof. Neeti Nair's Op-Ed in The Print and Ananda Bazar Patrika

Prof. Neeti Nair's Op-Ed in The Print and Ananda Bazar Patrika

Professor Neeti Nair published an op-ed at The Print (English and Hindi) and in the Ananda Bazar Patrika (Bengali) that seeks to situate the current protests against the Citizenship Amendment Act alongside a longer history of Indian secularism. The op-ed is available in English, Hindi, and Bengali

Professor Neeti Nair published an op-ed at The Print (English and Hindi) and in the Ananda Bazar Patrika (Bengali) that seeks to situate the current protests against the Citizensh

Fall 2019 Department Wrap-Up

Fall 2019 Department Wrap-Up

Below is a collection of some of the History Department's news and announcements, gathered throughout the Fall 2019 semester. 


New Publications

Sarah Milov published a new book titled The Cigarette. Smithsonian Magazine named it one of the ten best history books of 2019.

James Loeffler published (co-edited with Moria Paz) The Law of Strangers: Jewish Lawyers and International Law in the Twentieth Century with Cambridge University Press. 

Alan Taylor published Thomas Jefferson’s Education with W.W. Norton.

Kyrill Kunakhovich published (with Piotr Kosicki) The Long 1989: Decades of Global Revolution with Central European University Press. 
 

Awards

James Loeffler's book, Rooted Cosmopolitans: Jews and Human Rights in the Twentieth Century, won the 2019 Association for Jewish Studies Jordan Schnitzer Award for Best Book in Modern Jewish History as well as the 2019 American Historical Association’s Dorothy Rosenberg Prize.

Andrew Kahrl’s Free the Beaches: The Story of Ned Coll and the Battle for America’s Most Exclusive Shoreline received the Connecticut Book Award for best non-fiction book for 2018 from the Connecticut Center for the Book. The book also won the 2018 Homer D. Babbidge Award from the Association for the Study of Connecticut History.

Philip Zelikow’s book, To Build a Better World: Choices to End the Cold War and Create a Global Commonwealth, was #8 on the Washington Post’s non-fiction best-seller list

Forbes named Alan Taylor’s Thomas Jefferson’s Education one of the “Year’s Best Books About Higher Education.”

The Wall Street Journal named Liz Varon’s book, “Armies of Deliverance: A New History of the Civil War” one of the Best Books of 2019.

 

Articles & Book Reviews

Mel Leffler published an article in The Atlantic titled “China Isn’t the Soviet Union. Confusing the Two Is Dangerous.”

Philip Zelikow published an article titled “Self-Dealing in Ukraine: The Core of the Impeachment Inquiry,” for Lawfare.

Sarah Milov published an article on vaping in Time as well as an article on marijuana reform in The Atlantic.

Liz Varon wrote about UVA’s role in promulgating the Lost Cause creed for UVA Today’s series on the University in the age of segregation.

James Loeffler wrote a column in The Chronicle of Higher Education about human rights and the academic right.

Alan Taylor’s book, Thomas Jefferson’s Education was reviewed by The Atlantic.

The New Republic reviewed Sarah Milov’s book, The Cigarette: A Political History.

Neeti Nair reviewed Gyan Prakash’s book, Emergency Chronicles: Indira Gandhi and Democracy’s Turning Point in The New Rambler.    

Gary Gallagher (Emeritus Professor) reviewed Sidney Blumenthal's book, The Political Life of Abraham Lincoln, 1856-1860, in The Washington Post.  

The Los Angeles Review of Books featured Sarah Milov’s The Cigarette.

 

Media and Miscellaneous

Andrew Kahrl was named Interim Co-Director for Academic Affairs for the Democracy Initiative. He will serve with Melody Barnes, Co-Director for Policy and Public Affairs.

UVAToday highlighted John Mason in a faculty video series, focusing on his interdisciplinary research with the Eastside Speedway (Waynesboro) drag racing community. Watch the video here.

George Gilliam gave the keynote address at the annual meeting of the Virginia Association of Countries (VACo). His address focused on the 400th anniversary of the General Assembly.

Tom Klubock organized the University of Virginia Centro de las Américas’/Americas Center’s Fall Symposium, “From the Mouth of a Shark: Causes & Consequences of the Central American Refugee Crisis” with Micheline Marcom of the English department.

Black Bus Stop, a collaborative film project involving faculty and undergraduates in the departments of History and Studio Art, screened at the New York Film Festival and the BFI London Film Festival. A short review of the film was published in Artforum.

 

Interviews & Quotes

Sarah Milov’s interview with David Kessler, former FDA Commissioner, aired on CSPAN. Watch the program here.

Sarah Milov was interviewed by Jezebel about her new book, The Cigarette.

Neeti Nair was interviewed by the Telegraph India about the Ayodhya judgement and the Citizenship Amendment Act.

Max Edelson was interviewed by Forbes about Ken Fisher, dismissing the money manager's tweet arguing that slavery in the United States would have fallen on its own as “a fantasy." 

Will Hitchcock was interviewed by UVAToday about the GAGE (Governing America in a Global Era) initiative and its mission.

Carrie Janney was interviewed in a USA Today article exploring the representation of slavery at some of the nation’s most celebrated historic sites and monuments.  

Alan Taylor was interviewed in a Washington Post article about the brutal abuse endured by slaves at the University of Virginia.  

Elizabeth Varon was interviewed by Voice of America about the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson for a segment offering historical context to the impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump.

Justene Hill Edwards was quoted in a New York Times article about Attorney General Mark Herring’s recent announcement that couples in Virginia no longer need to declare their race as a requirement for a marriage certificate. 

Carrie Janney was quoted in The Washington Post in an article about recent efforts to restore the historic Frederick Douglass cemetery in Alexandria, Virginia.

Philip Zelikow was quoted in an article by James Fallows in The Atlantic and in a column by David Ignatius in The Washington Post.

 

Student and Graduate News

Amelia Wald, a recent graduate of our Distinguished Majors Program and former intern at the Nau Center for Civil War History, published a blog post that explores the wartime history of Charlottesville General Hospital.

DeAnza Cook, a recent graduate of our Distinguished Majors Program, participated in a panel (“Rethinking Police Power”) at the 104th Annual Meeting and Conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

Graduate student Justin McBrien wrote an op-ed, “This Is Not the Sixth Extinction. It’s the First Extermination Event,” for Truthout.  

Former graduate student Shira Lurie wrote an editorial in the Toronto Star that argues that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's “brownface” scandals are just a small part of a problem plaguing Canada. 

Former graduate student Melissa Gismondi wrote about Prime Minister Trudeau in a recent New York Times editorial.

Below is a collection of some of the History Department's news and announcements, gathered throughout the Fall 2019 semester. 


New Publications

Prof. Neeti Nair Interviewed by Telegraph India on Citizenship Amendment Act and Protests in India

Prof. Neeti Nair Interviewed by Telegraph India on Citizenship Amendment Act and Protests in India

Click here to read Prof. Nair's interview with The Telegraph India, covering the Citizenship Amendment Act and the ongoing protests in India. 

Publications

La Philanthropie En Amerique

La Philanthropie en Amérique

Freedom has a Face

Freedom Has a Face

Race, Identity, and Community in Jefferson's Virginia

The Inscriptions of Dodona and a New hisotry of Molossia

The Inscriptions of Dodona and a New History of Molossia

The History of a Founding Ideal

Merit

The History of a Founding Ideal from the American Revolution to the Twenty-First Century

Alexis de Tocqueville

Alexis de Tocqueville

Democracy in America: Volumes One and Two

Madison

The Papers of James Madison, Presidential Series, Volume 7

War of 1812

The War of 1812

Conflict for a Continent

The 9/11 Commission Report

The 9/11 Commission Report

The Attack from Planning to Aftermath

The Human Rights Revolution

The Human Rights Revolution

An International History

Philanthropy in America

Philanthropy in America

A History

The Long 1989

Decades of Global Revolution

In Uncertain Times

In Uncertain Times

American Foreign Policy after the Berlin Wall and 9/11

The Union War

The Union War

African-American History

African-American History

Changing Homelands

Changing Homelands

Hindu Politics and the Partition of India

Nation of Outsiders

A Nation of Outsiders

How the White Middle Class Fell in Love with Rebellion in Postwar America

Mapkc

Карл Маркс: Бремя разума

Remembering the Civil War

Remembering the Civil War

Reunion and the Limits of Reconciliation

The Cigarette

A Political History

Petersburg to Appomattox

Petersburg to Appomattox

The End of the War in Virginia

For the Soul of Mankind

For the Soul of Mankind

The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Cold War (Chinese translation)

Tesla

Tesla

Inventor of the Electrical Age

Becoming Confederates

Becoming Confederates

Paths to a New National Loyalty

Black Leaders on Leadership

Black Leaders on Leadership

Conversations with Julian Bond

Burying the Dead But Not the Past

Burying the Dead But Not The Past

Ladies' Memorial Associations & the Lost Cause

Taming the Unknown

Taming the Unknown

A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century

The Chile Reader

The Chile Reader

History, Culture, Politics

La Frontera

La Frontera

Forests and Ecological Conflict in Chile’s Frontier Territory

Tosaka Jun

Tosaka Jun

A Critical Reader

Bad Water

Bad Water

Nature, Pollution, and Politics in Japan, 1870–1950

The Punitive Turn

The Punitive Turn

New Approaches to Race and Incarceration

Sustainability

Environmental Sustainability in Transatlantic Perspective

The King's Bishop

The King's Bishops

The Politics of Patronage in England and Normandy, 1066-1216

Appomattox

Appomattox

Victory, Defeat, and Freedom at the End of the Civil War

Lens of War

Lens of War

Exploring Iconic Photographs of the Civil War

By Sword and Plow

By Sword and Plow

France and the Conquest of Algeria

Culture

Culture, Vernacular Politics, and the Peasants

India, 1889-1950: An Edited Translation

The Associational State

The Associational State

American Governance in the Twentieth Century

Discovering Tuberculosis

Discovering Tuberculosis

A Global History, 1900 to the Present

Enlightenment Underground

Enlightenment Underground

Radical Germany, 1680-1720

Cold Harbor

Cold Harbor to the Crater The End of the Overland Campaign

Ruling Minds

Ruling Minds

Psychology in the British Empire

Causes Won and Lost

Causes Won and Lost

The End of the Civil War

The American War

The American War

A History of the Civil War Era

Shaper Nations

Shaper Nations

Strategies for a Changing World

Anthropocene or Capitalocene?

Anthropocene or Capitalocene?

Nature, History, and the Crisis of Capitalism

Charlotteville 2017

Charlottesville 2017

The Legacy of Race and Inequity

The Age of Eisenhower

The Age of Eisenhower

America and the World in the 1950s

All In

All In

The Spread of Gambling in Twentieth-Century United States

La Nacion Sentida

La nación sentida

Rooted Cosmopolitans

Rooted Cosmopolitans

Jews and Human Rights in the Twentieth Century

Piracy and Law

Piracy and Law in the Ottoman Mediterranean

Singing the Resurrection

Singing the Resurrection

Body, Community, and Belief in Reformation Europe

Sea of Debt

A Sea of Debt

Law and Economic Life in the Western Indian Ocean, 1780-1950

Armies of Deliverance

A New History of the Civil War

The Law of Strangers

Jewish Lawyers and International Law in the Twentieth Century

To Build a Better World

Choices to End the Cold War and Create a Global Commonwealth

Events

January 23, 2020

Harrison Institute & Small Special Collections Library Auditorium | 5:00PM-6:30PM

April 3, 2020

Harrison Institute & Small Special Collections Library Auditorium | 9:00AM-5:00PM

January 15, 2020

Nau Hall 101 | 5:00PM

November 8, 2019

Wilson 301 | 5:00PM

Corcoran Department of History

The University of Virginia's Corcoran Department of History has long been one of the anchors for liberal and humane education in the College of Arts & Sciences. Members of the Department are nationally and internationally recognized for their scholarship and teaching. As scholars, the faculty specialize in a wide range of disciplines — cultural, diplomatic, economic, environmental history, history of science & technology, intellectual, legal, military, political, public history, and social history.  Areas of interest span the globe from Africa, to East Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, South Asia, and the United States. As teachers, our faculty seek above all to lead students to reflect more deeply on the role historical forces and processes play in the human condition. Offering over 100 courses a year, the faculty teach introductory surveys as well as seminars and colloquia to undergraduates and graduate students. The Department's intellectual breadth is enhanced by its close relationship with the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American & African Studies, the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies (CREEES), the Classics Department, an emerging Law & History nexus between the Department and the School of Law,  the Miller Center for Study of the American Presidency, and the Committee on the History of Environment, Science, and Technology (CHEST). Members of the Department are also closely involved with several interdisciplinary programs in the College of Arts & Sciences such as, American Studies, Latin American Studies, Middle-Eastern Studies, Medieval Studies Program, and Women, Gender, & Sexuality Studies.  Others work at the convergence of humanities and digital technology, both in research and in novel approaches to historical pedagogy.