Events

The White Power Movement from Vietnam to Charlottesville

The White Power Movement from Vietnam to Charlottesville

5:00PM-6:30PM | Gibson 211

Kathleen Belew (History Dept., University of Chicago), will speak about her new book, Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America (Harvard University Press), which explores the rise of the “white power” paramilitary movement from the Vietnam War era to today. Part of the “When the Fascists Came to Town: Reflections on the Radical Right from Weimar to Charlottesville” series, supported by the Page-Barbour Fund of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Thursday, October 25, 2018

5:00PM-6:30PM | Gibson 211

The History of A12 and Its Meaning

The History of A12 and Its Meaning

5:30PM-7:00PM | Nau Hall 342

The creator of new podcast series "A12," Dr. Nicole Hemmer explores why the alt-right descended on Charlottesville and how the city and university have grappled with the aftermath. 

Hemmer's talk explores the events of A12, the varieties of activism that developed during the Summer of Hate, the failures of city and university leadership, and what has happened to the alt-right in the year since they attacked the university and the city. 

Hemmer is Assistant Professor at the Miller Center and co-founder and editor of "Made by History" at the Washington Post

You can listen to the podcast here. The podcast features extended interviews with John Mason, Claudrena Harold, Risa Goluboff, and many other UVa and city voices. The series dives into the city's history, especially of Charlottesville's African American community, and places the riots of A12 in a rich historical context. 

Sponsored by the Page Barbour Fund for the project "When the Fascists Came to Town." 

Contact: wih9u@virginia.edu

Monday, October 1, 2018

5:30PM-7:00PM | Nau Hall 342

Re-envisioning Race and Education in the New South

Re-envisioning Race and Education in the New South

4:00PM | Alumni Hall & Abbott Center Auditorium

Center for Race and Public Education in the South Symposium:

Re-envisioning Race and Education in the New South

 

Tuesday, Oct 9th

8:45 am-10:00 am: Graduate Student Poster Session

10:15 am-11:30 am: Center and Institute Directors: “New Directions in the Study of Race and Education in the United States”

11:45 am-12:55 pm: Working lunch with Center Directors (70-minute lunch with 5-min break)

1:00 pm-2:15  pm: Race, Achievement, and Culturally Relevant Education 

2:30 pm-3:45 pm: Race and the Moral and Civic Formation of Children in Schools (sponsored by the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture)

4:00 pm: Lecture. Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings, Alumni Hall

Wednesday, Oct 10th

10:00 am- 11:00: A Conversation with James Anderson

11:00 am-12: 30 pm: Higher Education and Race in the 21st Century

12:30-1:30 Lunch with panelists

1:30 pm-3:00 pm: History of Race and Education in the South

4:00 pm -6:00 pm, Dr. James D. Anderson, Abbott Center Auditorium, The UVA Inn at Darden

 

All events in Holloway Hall unless otherwise stated.

 

Keynote Speakers

October 9, 4 pm, Alumni Hall

Lecture: "Hot Sauce in My Bag Swag: Hybridity, Complexity, and Fluidity in 21st Century Racial Identity." 

Gloria Ladson-Billings is the Kellner Family Distinguished Professor of Urban Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and faculty affiliate in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She was the 2005-2006 president of the American Educational Research Association. Ladson-Billings’ research examines the pedagogical practices of teachers who are successful with African American students. She also investigates Critical Race Theory applications to education. She is the author of the critically acclaimed books The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children and Crossing Over to Canaan: The Journey of New Teachers in Diverse Classrooms, and numerous journal articles and book chapters. She is the former editor of the American Educational Research Journal and a member of several editorial boards. Her work has won numerous scholarly awards including the H.I. Romnes Faculty Fellowship, the NAEd/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship, and the Palmer O. Johnson outstanding research award. During the 2003-2004 academic year, she was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. In fall of 2004, she received the George and Louise Spindler Award from the Council on Anthropology and Education for significant and ongoing contributions to the field of educational anthropology. She holds honorary degrees from Umeå University (Umeå Sweden), University of Massachusetts-Lowell, and the University of Alicante (Alicante, Spain). In 2016, Professor Ladson-Billings was elected President of the National Academy of Education.

 

October 10th, Abbott Center Auditorium, UVA Inn at Darden

Lecture: “Citizenship, Immigration, and National Identity: Civic Education on the Sesquicentennial Anniversary of the 14th Amendment”

James D. Anderson is dean of the College of Education, the Edward William and Jane Marr Gutgsell Professor of Education; and affiliate Professor of History at the University of Illinois. His scholarship focuses broadly on the history of U.S. education, with specializations in the history of African American education in the South, the history of higher education desegregation, the history of public school desegregation, and the history of African American school achievement in the 20th century. His book, The Education of Blacks in the South, 1860-1935, won the American Educational Research Association outstanding book award in 1990. He is senior editor of the History of Education Quarterly. Anderson has served as an expert witness in a series of federal desegregation and affirmative action cases, including Jenkins v. Missouri, Knight v. Alabama, Ayers v. Mississippi, Gratz v. Bollinger, and Grutter v. Bollinger. He served as an adviser for and participant in the PBS documentaries School: The Story of American Public Education (2001), The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow (2002) and Forgotten Genius: The Percy Julian Story. He was elected to the National Academy of Education in 2008. In 2012, he was selected as a Fellow for Outstanding Research by the American Educational Research Association and received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. In 2013, he was selected Center for Advanced Study Professor of Education Policy, Organization and Leadership at the University of Illinois.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018 to Wednesday, October 10, 2018

4:00PM | Alumni Hall & Abbott Center Auditorium

Beyond Jefferson: The Randolphs, Hemingses, and the Idea of the West, 1820-1900

Beyond Jefferson: The Randolphs, Hemingses, and the Idea of the West, 1820-1900

3:30PM-5:00PM | Nau 342

Christa Dierksheide, "Beyond Jefferson: The Randolphs, Hemingses, and the Idea of the West, 1820-1900." Dierksheide is assistant professor of history at the University of Missouri.  She is the author of Amelioration and Empire: Progress and Slavery in the Plantation Americas (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2014).

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

3:30PM-5:00PM | Nau 342

Notes on the State of Jupiter: Thomas Jefferson and his Bodyservant Jupiter Evans

Notes on the State of Jupiter: Thomas Jefferson and his Bodyservant Jupiter Evans

3:30PM-5:00PM | Nau 342

Susan Kern, "Notes on the State of Jupiter: Thomas Jefferson and his Bodyservant Jupiter Evans."  Kern is the executive director of the Historic Campus and adjunct associate professor of history at the College of William and Mary.  

She is the author of The Jeffersons at Shadwell (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010).

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

3:30PM-5:00PM | Nau 342

The Antisemitic Origins of “Fake News” and the Fate of American Democracy

The Antisemitic Origins of “Fake News” and the Fate of American Democracy

5:00PM | Nau Hall 324

This talk is by Professor Victoria Saker Woeste of the American Bar Foundation. The talk will take place on September 17 at 5:00PM in Nau Hall 324.

A leading scholar in the field of U.S. legal history, Professor Woeste will discuss her current work, Suing Henry Ford: America’s First Hate Speech Case, and the forgotten ties between pre-World War II American antisemitism and the contemporary Alt-Right, as well as the history of legal activism against hate speech. Her books include The Farmer's Benevolent Trust: Law and Agricultural Cooperation in Industrial America, 1865-1945 (1998) and Henry Ford's War on Jews and the Legal Battle Against Hate Speech (2012).

This presentation is part of the series, “When the Fascists Came to Town: Reflections on the Radical Right from Weimar to Charlottesville,” co-sponsored by the Corcoran Department of History, the Center for German Studies, the Jewish Studies Program, and the Institute for Humanities and Global Cultures, with the support of the Page-Barbour Fund.

A pre-distributed paper is available for attendees. Please contact Professor James Loeffler for a copy or with other questions at jbl6w@virginia.edu.

 

Monday, September 17, 2018

5:00PM | Nau Hall 324

The Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant

The Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant

5:00PM-6:30PM | Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library Auditorium

The John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History presents "The Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant: A Conversation with John F. Marszalek." 

The event will take place on Thursday, September 20th, 2018 from 5:00-6:30pm. The location is the Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library Auditorium at UVA. 

John F. Marszalek is excutive director and managing editor of the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Library and Giles Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Mississippi State University. This lecture is free and open to the public. 

Thursday, September 20, 2018

5:00PM-6:30PM | Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library Auditorium

New Registers for Old Debts: Municipal Courts and Micro-lending in Nineteenth Century Mexico

New Registers for Old Debts: Municipal Courts and Micro-lending in Nineteenth Century Mexico

10:00AM | 117 Wilson Hall

Friday, September 21, 2018

10:00AM | 117 Wilson Hall

Lecture: Jason W. Moore, "Climate, Class, & Civilizational Crisis, 376-2018"

Lecture: Jason W. Moore, "Climate, Class, & Civilizational Crisis, 376-2018"

5:00 pm | Bryan Hall, 2nd Floor Faculty Lounge

Tomorrow, May 3, the renowned environmental historian Jason W. Moore will be giving a far-ranging lecture entitled  Climate, Class, & Civilizational Crisis: 376-2018." (That's 376 as in the year 376!)

The talk, which has been organized in part by the history department's Prof. Robert Stolz and grad student Justin McBrien, will take place on May 3 at 5pm in the faculty lounge on the 2nd floor of Bryan Hall.

For more information, please see the lecture's facebook event page.

Thursday, May 3, 2018

5:00 pm | Bryan Hall, 2nd Floor Faculty Lounge

History & Theory Conference for Marx's 200th Birthday

History & Theory Conference for Marx's 200th Birthday

12:30-5:15 pm | Monroe Hall 122

In celebration of Karl Marx's 200th birthday, the History & Theory Workshop at the University of Virginia is hosting a conference of 4 panels to discuss the continuing relevance of Marx's writings to our world today. No invitation or ticket is required, anyone who is interested is welcome, and you are encouraged to come ready to ask questions and engage with both panelists and other attendees.

Tentative Schedule:
Panels: 
Monroe Hall 122, 12:30-5:15
Marx and Social Justice: 12:30-1:30
1. Anup Gampa (Psychology), “Implicit and Explicit Racial Attitudes Changed During Black Lives Matter"
2. Monica Blair (History), “Charlottesville's General Strike: Teaching Local Histories of Black Reconstruction.”
3. Gillet Rosenblith (History), "To Lose Your Housing is Double Jeopardy: Public Housing in the United States, 1969-2001"

Marx and Revolution: 1:30-2:50
1. Nick Scott (History), “Revolutionary Space: Cordon Industrial Vicuna Mackenna and the Chilean Road to Socialism, 1972-1973”
2. Crystal Luo (History), “Asian America and the Specter of Immigration Reform, 1968-1975.” 
3. Abeer Saha (History), “Animal Factory: The Rise of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations, 1945-2000.”
4. Gio Senzano, (Philosophy), “The Proletarization of the Puerto Rican”

Marx and Fascism: 3:00-4:00
1. Robert Stolz (History), “Tosaka Jun: The Uses and Abuses of Feudalism”
2. John Tiernan Low (History/Linguistics), “The Center's Tepid Friendship with the Alt-Right and its Historical Precedents”
3. Charles Hamilton (History), “Solidarity not Surrender: British Anti-Fascism Since 1970.”

Marx and Media: 4:10-5:10
1. Brooks Hefner (English, JMU), “Political Economy and Popular Culture”
2. Chris Ali (Media Studies), “Marx and the Study of Media policy: Methodologies and Expectations”
3. Justin McBrien (History), “Charlton Heston: Prophet of Eco-Apocalypse or Propagandist of Eco-Resilience?”

Keynote: English Faculty Lounge, Brooks Hall, 5:30-7:00
1. Matthew Garrett (Wesleyan University), “Reading Is Theft”

 

There is also a Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/594239410945080/

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

12:30-5:15 pm | Monroe Hall 122

Athletics and Race at UVa Panel

Athletics and Race at UVa Panel

5:00-6:30 pm | Nau 101

This Friday (April 27), the Corcoran Department of History will be holding a panel discussion on Athletics and Race at UVa. The panel will feature UVa's athletic director Carla Williams as well as Chris Long (former UVA All-American football player, two-time Super Bowl champion) and Akil Mitchell (former UVa All-ACC men’s basketball player). The discussion will be moderated by Prof. Claudrena Harold.

The event is scheduled for Friday, April 27 from 5-6:30 p.m. at 101 Nau Hall at the University of Virginia. The event is free to the public, but seating is limited with a capacity of 245. Nau Hall is located at 1550 Jefferson Park Avenue. Parking is available at the University’s Central Grounds Garage ($1/hour, payable at exit).

Friday, April 27, 2018

5:00-6:30 pm | Nau 101

Cross Lecture: "What Makes a Court Supreme?"

Cross Lecture: "What Makes a Court Supreme?"

3:30 pm | Small Special Collections Library

Every year, the History Department hosts the Robert D. Cross Memorial Lecture in honor of former department professor Bob Cross. This year's lecture will be given by Paul Halliday, the Julian Bishko professor of history.

Titled "What Makes a Court Supreme? The View from Ceylon," the lecture will be given on Wednesday, April 25, at 3:30pm, in the Auditorium of the Harrison Institute at the Small Special Collections Library. The event is open to the public, and there will be a reception following the lecture.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

3:30 pm | Small Special Collections Library

Toppling Monuments Symposium

Toppling Monuments Symposium

This Thursday and Friday, the Department of Religious Studies, in conjunction with several other organizations at UVa, will be hosting a symposium titled "Toppling Monuments." The symposium will examine history, memory, and the power of images. Among the speakers will be history dept. professor Kyrill Kunakhovich! Check out the details below.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Opening Reception for East German Living Room Museum

Opening Reception for East German Living Room Museum

4:00-6:00 pm | Nau 252

Ever wonder about life behind the Iron Curtain? What does a communist comic book look like? Would you like to play an East German guitar? Then come visit our exhibition:

The East German Living Room: Everyday Life Behind the Berlin Wall

Nau Hall 252

Wednesday, April 18, from 4 to 6pm

Featuring an East German juice cocktail from the recipe book Drinks of the GDR

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

4:00-6:00 pm | Nau 252

Life in the UniverCity Symposium

Life in the UniverCity Symposium

How have the politics of Charlottesville and UVA changed since the attacks of Aug. 11-12? What is UVA’s impact on the city and its residents? How can UVA students better engage with local issues and populations during their time on Grounds? At this year-end symposium, students in the Community and Civic Engagement course “All Politics Is Local” will be presenting and discussing their collaborative work with local organizations over the past year and research on critical issues facing Charlottesville and UVA today. The event will culminate with a keynote address by historian Davarian L. Baldwin, author of the forthcoming book “UniverCities: How Higher Education is Transforming Urban America."

Friday, April 27, 2018

"They Shall Not Perish" Film Screening and Discussion

"They Shall Not Perish" Film Screening and Discussion

6:00 pm | Nau 101

As part of the “Sanctuary and Belonging: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Flight, Refuge and Community” Symposium, there will be a screening of the documentary “They Shall Not Perish.” This film details the unprecedented humanitarian efforts of thousands of Americans who helped save a generation of orphans and refugees as a response to the Armenian Genocide in 1915.

The one hour screening will be followed by a discussion with Charles Benjamin, Ph.D., the President of the Near East Foundation and Leon Yacoubian, a UVA SEAS 4th year who founded “Tuff Armenia Project."

The event will begin at 6pm on Wed., April 11 in Nau 101.

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

6:00 pm | Nau 101

Leffler Discusses National Security State under Truman

Leffler Discusses National Security State under Truman

3:30 pm | The Miller Center

Come see Prof. Melvyn Leffler discuss the formation of the national security state during the Harry Truman administration! This event will take place at the Miller Center on April 10 at 3:30pm, and will be moderated by Prof. William Hitchcock.

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

3:30 pm | The Miller Center

Penny Von Eschen to Speak about Cold War Nostalgia

Penny Von Eschen to Speak about Cold War Nostalgia

3:30 pm | Nau 342

Ever feel nostalgic for a simpler time when the only thing we had to worry about was Comrade Gorbachev? Then come see Penny Von Eschen, the L. Sanford and Jo Mills Reis Professor of Humanities at Cornell University, next week! Dr. Von Eschen will be giving a lecture entitled “‘God I Miss the Cold War’: Nostalgia, Triumphalism, and Global Disorder Since 1989.” The talk will be held on April 4 at 3:30pm in Nau 342.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

3:30 pm | Nau 342

Roundtable on Memory, Responsibility, & Transformation

Roundtable on Memory, Responsibility, & Transformation

6:00-8:00 pm | New Cabell 236

Prof. Manuela Achilles and the UVa Center for German Studies have put together a roundtable discussion tomorrow evening. Titled "Memory, Responsibility & Transformation," the event will explore the difficulties and necessities of confronting the past, in both Charlottesville and in Germany.

The event takes place tomorrow, March 27, from 6:00-8:00pm in New Cabell 236. The roundtable is free and open to the public, and refreshments will be provided.

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

6:00-8:00 pm | New Cabell 236

Didem Havlioğlu to Speak about Gender and Ottoman Poetry

Didem Havlioğlu to Speak about Gender and Ottoman Poetry

11:00 am | Robertson 123

Come see Didem Havlioğlu speak about the work of Mihri Hatun, a 16th-century woman Ottoman poet. Dr. Havlioğlu will talk in particular about what it meant to be a female intellectual in the male-dominated world of early modern Islam.

The lecture begins at 11 am on March 29, in Robertson 123.

Thursday, March 29, 2018

11:00 am | Robertson 123

Nau Center to Host Civil War Lives Conference

Nau Center to Host Civil War Lives Conference

8:30 am-5:00 pm | Special Collections Library Auditorium

The John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History will host its third annual signature conference titled, "Civil War Lives," on Friday, March 30. The event will start at 8:30 AM and will be held in the auditorium of the Special Collections Library. The conference is free and open to everyone at UVA as well as the general public and no advance registration is required. Please feel free to come for all or just part of our event.

The conference will feature talks on important Civil War figures given by leading historians of the conflict including David Blight, Matthew Gallman, Stephen Cushman, Joan Waugh, Gary Gallagher, and Elizabeth Varon. Please see the flyer below, or the Nau Center's website for more details.

Friday, March 30, 2018

8:30 am-5:00 pm | Special Collections Library Auditorium

A Panel on the History of Greek Life and Race Relations at UVa

A Panel on the History of Greek Life and Race Relations at UVa

7:00 pm | Minor Hall 125

The Inter-Fraternity Council has partnered with UVA's Corcoran Department of History to sponsor a panel that will explore the history of Greek life and race at UVa over the past century. The event will take place in MINOR HALL Room 125 on TUESDAY, MARCH 20 at 7:00 p.m. The conversation will be between Professor Ervin Jordan, Dr. Cameron Webb, fourth-year Jasmine Zollar, and members of the IFC community. It will be moderated by fourth-year Ashwanth Samuel.

Professor Jordan is a research Archivist at UVA's Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library. Professor Webb is a UVA alum and now is on the faculty at the UVA Medical School. Jasmine Zollar is a fourth-year in the NPHC Sorority, Delta Sigma Theta Inc. Ashwanth Samuel is the current President of the IFC.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

7:00 pm | Minor Hall 125

Lecture by Professor Louis Nelson, "The University of Virginia: Revolutionary Intentions & Landscapes of Slavery"

Lecture by Professor Louis Nelson, "The University of Virginia: Revolutionary Intentions & Landscapes of Slavery"

6:00 pm | Garden Room of Hotel E

Come see Louis Nelson, professor of History and Architechture at the University, give a lecture on Wednesday, March 28 at 6pm in the Garden Room of Hotel E. Prof. Nelson's lecture is entitled "The University of Virginia: Revolutionary Intentions & Landscapes of Slavery." The talk will discuss Jefferson's career as a both a revolutionary thinker and architect materialized in Monticello and the University, where his ideals for shaping a new nation and educating a body politic came to life. But as a product of its place and time, UVA was also a landscape of slavery. This lecture integrates these two realities into a single interwoven and complicated place and introduces recent research and digital tools being used to better understand the place of slavery in the everyday life of the University.

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

6:00 pm | Garden Room of Hotel E

IHGC Graduate Conference on Race, Labor, and Empire

IHGC Graduate Conference on Race, Labor, and Empire

| Wilson 142

On the weekend of March 16-18th, the UVa IHGC will be hosting a graduate conference on "Rethinking the History of Modern Political Concepts: Race and Division of Labor in Global Western Empires, 1791 - 1888." The conference, which will take place in Wilson 142, has been co-organized by History grad student Swati Chawla, and features department professors Fahad Bishara and Erik Linkstrum as panel chairs. For more details and a full schedule, please visit the IHGC's website.

Friday, March 16, 2018

Guoqi Xu Gives a Lecture on Modern Sports & the Idea of China

Guoqi Xu Gives a Lecture on Modern Sports & the Idea of China

3:15 pm | Monroe Hall 124

Prof. Guoqi Xu, the Kerry Group Professor in Globalization History at the University of Hong Kong, will be giving a lecture on "Modern Sports & the Idea of China." Xu will be investigating what sports can tell us about the idea of "china" and "Chinaness" since the late 19th century. The lecture will be given in Monroe Hall 124 on Friday, February 23, at 3:15pm.

Friday, February 23, 2018

3:15 pm | Monroe Hall 124

Geoff Eley to Speak on Fascism and Antifascism

Geoff Eley to Speak on Fascism and Antifascism

4:00 pm | Newcomb Hall Gallery

Please come to see Geoff Eley, one of the most important scholars of German and European history today, deliver a lecture on "Fascism and Antifascism, 1920-2020."  Dr. Eley will be speaking in the Newcomb Hall Gallery on Monday, February 19, at 4pm

Monday, February 19, 2018

4:00 pm | Newcomb Hall Gallery

Christian Parenti to Speak about Climate Change

Christian Parenti to Speak about Climate Change

4:30 pm | Wilson 301

Christian Parenti, associate professor of economics at John Jay College, City University of New York, will be coming to UVa to speak about the economics of climate change. His lecture, titled "Coping with Crisis: Climate Change and Economic Transformation," will draw on his work as a journalist reporting from conflict zones hit by climate-change driven crisis, and on his more recent research into American economic history, to examine the likely social and economic dislocations promised by climate change. He will explore how the US could be drawing on its own history of state planning and public investment to drive the economic transformations necessary to effectively mitigate and adapt to the climate crisis, and will address how the American public can help build political will for such a project, despite the acute challenges of the Trump presidency.

The lecture, which is organized by History Department graduate student Justin McBrien, and sponsored by History faculty Tom Klubock, Brian Owensby, and Robert Stolz, will take place at 4:30pm on February 13 in Wilson 301.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

4:30 pm | Wilson 301

Christina Mobley to Speak at the 2018 Mellon Fellows Symposium

Christina Mobley to Speak at the 2018 Mellon Fellows Symposium

9:30 am | Wilson 142

Come see Christina Mobley speak at the 2018 Mellon Fellows Symposium, along with colleagues from MESALC (Middle Eastern and South Asian Language and Cultures) and Politics! Prof. Mobley's talk, "Voodoo History" will examine the transnational character of the Haitian Revolution. The symposium kicks off at 9:30am on February 16 in Wilson 142.

Monday, February 5, 2018

9:30 am | Wilson 142

Protest and Resistance: The Polish Lecture Series, Spring 2018

Protest and Resistance: The Polish Lecture Series, Spring 2018

5:00 pm | Nau 211

The UVa Polish Lecture Series has announced its schedule for Spring 2018. The theme of this semester's series is "Protest and Resistance." All talks will be held at 5pm in Nau 211.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

5:00 pm | Nau 211

Benson & Guerra: Afro-Cuban Activisms

Benson & Guerra: Afro-Cuban Activisms

5:00 pm | Minor Hall 125

Please join us on February 23 to hear Devyn Spence Benson and Lillian Guerra speak about Afro-Cuban Activisms. The talk will be held at 5pm in Minor Hall 125.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

5:00 pm | Minor Hall 125

Contested Spaces: Examining the Past, the Present, and the Forgotten at the University

Contested Spaces: Examining the Past, the Present, and the Forgotten at the University

6:30 pm | Nau-Gibson Hall Lobby

Join us on Tuesday, November 28 at 6:30 pm in the Darden Lobby of Nau-Gibson Hall for the opening of "Contested Spaces: Examining the Past, the Present, and the Forgotten at the University." As part of the celebration of the University's Bicentennial, the exhibition seeks to explore issues of community power dynamics, exclusivity, student agency, and student responsibility at the University through the prism of spaces and their changing use and appropration over time. The project was conceived, designed, and executed by the students of Dr. Waitman Beorn's class, "Curating the Past," a new course offered by the History Department this fall. The event will begin with remarks from students in the class and a faculty speaker. Light refreshments will be provided.

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

6:30 pm | Nau-Gibson Hall Lobby

A job market for unmarried people? Rethinking marriage bars in the United States (1900-1941)

A job market for unmarried people? Rethinking marriage bars in the United States (1900-1941)

12:00-1:30 pm | Nau 342

A paper presentation by Romain Huret, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales - EHESS

This lecture deals with the proliferation of marriage bars in the early decades of the twentieth century. Bars concerned the hiring and firing of married women and arose in teaching and clerical work from the late 1800’s to the early 1900’s. Economists and historians have scrutinized the two barriers put in place -the hiring of married women; retention of existing workers when they married- and have given many explanations to explain the reasons for such discriminatory practices that ended in the 1950s. This lecture revises current scholarship by looking at the marriage bars through the eyes of unmarried people themselves. It carries out a case study of both my epistemological and methodological framework used for my larger project on unmarried people in the United States.

Lunch will be provided.

Monday, November 6, 12:00-1:30pm,  Nau 342

Read Dr. Huret's paper here.

Monday, November 6, 2017

12:00-1:30 pm | Nau 342

“Polish Culture Under Nazism and Stalinism: Cultural Losses of 1939-1956”

“Polish Culture Under Nazism and Stalinism: Cultural Losses of 1939-1956”

5:00-6:30 pm | New Cabell 309

CREEES is proud to announce the first Polish Lecture Series event of the year:

Polish Culture Under Nazism and Stalinism: Cultural Losses of 1939-1956
Dr. Łukasz Michalski, Director of Państwowy Instytut Wydawniczy [The State Publishing Institute], Warsaw, Poland

October 17, 2017, 5:00-6:30PM, New Cabell 309

Organized and sponsored by CREEES as part of the UVa Polish Lecture Series

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

5:00-6:30 pm | New Cabell 309

Staging the Administrative State: The Board of Tax Appeals in Plain Sight, 1935-1937

Staging the Administrative State: The Board of Tax Appeals in Plain Sight, 1935-1937

4:00-5:30 pm | Nau 342

MADCAP Presents: “Staging the Administrative State: The Board of Tax Appeals in Plain Sight, 1935-1937,” a presentation by Romain Huret of The School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences, Paris

Thursday October 19, 4:00-5:30pm, Nau Hall 342

This paper focuses on an obscure administrative body – the Board of Tax Appeals – that suddenly came into the spotlight in the mid-1930s during the Andrew W. Mellon trial. If historians have carefully traced the intellectual origins of administrative agencies and administrative law in early twentieth-century and have paid close attention to the decisive role of New Dealers, they have neglected the concrete dimension of its rise - what Abe Fortas called the "theater of law." Until the New Deal, the administrative state was almost invisible for millions of Americans. Commissions and agencies were largely out-of-sight, and the administrative state took the form of cold and anonymous decisions taken in Washington D.C. By revisiting the literature on the New Deal state, this paper shows how the trial gave New Dealers the opportunity to provide a more concrete and solemn dimension to administrative agencies. It was part of an attempt to legitimize the new federal power by inscribing it in the daily lives of citizens. 

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

4:00-5:30 pm | Nau 342

The Recent History of the Alt-Right: What You Need to Know

The Recent History of the Alt-Right: What You Need to Know

5:00-6:30 pm | Nau 101

The Corcoran Department of History presents a conversation with Jamelle Bouie (Slate Magazine), Dahlia Lithwick (Slate Magazine), and Nicole Hemmer (Washington Post and Miller Center) on the Alt-Right in contemporary American politics.

Wednesday, October 11, 5:00-6:30pm, Nau Hall 101, South Lawn

This event is free and open to the public; no pre-registration required.
Sponsored by the Corcoran Department of History

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

5:00-6:30 pm | Nau 101

The Fascist Threat: What you Should Know

The Fascist Threat: What you Should Know

5:30-7:00 pm | Nau 101

A Public Conversation with Manuela Achilles, William Hitchcock, James Loeffler, Kyrill Kunakhovich, and Sarah Milov

  • What is Fascism?
  • Hitler’s Rise to Power 
  • Fascism in the USA
  • Neo-Fascism and Neo-Nazism
  • Antisemitism Today
  • Fascism and Charlottesville

Wednesday, September 27, 5:30-7pm, Nau Hall 101

This event is free and open to the public; no registration required
Sponsored by the Corcoran Department of History, the Center for German Studies, and the Program in Jewish Studies

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

5:30-7:00 pm | Nau 101

“Civil War Memory: Charlottesville and Beyond”

“Civil War Memory: Charlottesville and Beyond”

5:00-6:15 pm | Nau 101

“Civil War Memory:  Charlottesville and Beyond” A Conversation with Gary Gallagher, John Mason and Elizabeth Varon

Wednesday September 13, 5:00-6:15

Nau Hall 101, South Lawn

This event is free and open to the public; no pre-registration required.

Sponsors:  Corcoran Department of History and John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

5:00-6:15 pm | Nau 101

The Struggle for Racial Justice at the University of Virginia

The Struggle for Racial Justice at the University of Virginia

5:00 pm | Nau 211

August 30, 5:00 p.m. 

Nau Hall 211, South Lawn

On Wednesday, August 30th, the Department of History will host a series of conversations that explore the ongoing struggle for social justice and racial equality at the University of Virginia (UVA) and situates the racist events of August 11th and August 12th within a larger historical perspective. The opening talk, led by Professor Claudrena Harold, will engage the following questions: What does the complex nature of political, intellectual, and social life at the University of Virginia tell us about how race is lived and experienced in 21st century America?  How and to what degree have the individual and collective experiences of African American undergraduates transformed since the late 1960s and early 1970s? How have those transformations been shaped by larger political developments in higher education, U.S. race relations, etc.?   And to what degree can an engagement with the history of civil rights and social justice movements at the University and beyond assist current efforts to make the University a more democratic and safe space for students, faculty, workers, etc.?  

Professor Harold's 15-20 minute talk will be followed by breakout sessions led by other faculty members (including but not limited to Professors Grace Hale, Will Hitchcock, Andrew Kahrl, and Sarah Milov).

The event will start at 5 p.m. in Nau Hall 211 and breakout sessions will be held in Nau 211, Nau 342, and Gibson 411.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

5:00 pm | Nau 211

Megill Cross Lecture: "History's Roots in Sensibility and Difference"

Megill Cross Lecture: "History's Roots in Sensibility and Difference"

| Harrison-Small Auditorium

Prof. Allan Megill will deliver the annual Robert D. Cross Memorial Lecture Wednesday, April 12 in Harrison-Small Auditorium. His lecture is titled “History’s Roots in Sensibility and Difference”

Reception to follow. 

Click here for more on the Cross lecture series.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

"Shenandoah at War," Nau Center Signature Conference (2017)

"Shenandoah at War," Nau Center Signature Conference (2017)

8:30 am-5:00 pm | Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library Auditorium

The Center’s signature conference for 2016-2017, “The Shenandoah at War: Soldiers and Civilians in Virginia’s Great Valley,” will be held on March 31, 2017.  Speakers will include Joseph T. Glatthaar of the University of North Carolina, Stephen B. Cushman of the University of Virginia, Caroline E. Janney of Purdue University, Edward Ayers, president emeritus of the University of Richmond, Kathryn Shively Meier of Virginia Commonwealth University, and John Matsui of the Virginia Military Institute. The lecturers will address military and nonmilitary dimensions of the Valley’s experience during the Civil War, as well as the ways in which the Shenandoah figured in postwar memory.

The event will be held in the auditorium of UVA's Special Collections Library. The conference is free and open to the public. Paid parking is available nearby at the Central Grounds Parking Garage.

Here is the conference lineup and schedule (Download the official conference program here):

Session 1

8:00: Coffee available

8:30: Opening remarks from Gary Gallagher and Elizabeth Varon

8:45-9:30: Stephen B. Cushman, University of Virginia, “Destruction, Reconstruction, and Richard Taylor's Happy Valley”

9:40-10:25: John Matsui, Virginia Military Institute, “Overgrown Sows and Puritans: Religion and Occupation in the Valley, 1862-64”

10:35–11:20: Kathryn Shively Meier, Virginia Commonwealth University, “Duty to My Country and Myself: Jubal Early on His Defeat in the Shenandoah”

11:30-12:00: Question and Answer Session #1

12:00-1:00: Lunch

Session 2

1:15-2:00: Joseph T. Glatthaar, University of North Carolina, “Generalship, Politics, and Personalities: The Union High Command During Jubal Early's Raid on Washington in 1864”

2:10-2:55: Caroline E. Janney, Purdue University, “Going Home: Disbanding the Remnants of Lee’s Army in the Valley”

3:15-4:00: Edward L. Ayers, president emeritus of the University of Richmond, “The War in the Valley as the War in Microcosm”

4:15-4:45: Question and Answer Session #2

4:50-5:00: Farewell remarks from Gary Gallagher and Elizabeth Varon

Date: 

Friday, March 31, 2017

Time and Location: 

8:30 AM to 5:00 PM, Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library Auditorium

Friday, March 31, 2017

8:30 am-5:00 pm | Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library Auditorium

Capitalocene, Necrocene, Anthropocene: Work, Life, & Power in the (Un)Making of Our Capitalogenic World-Ecology

Capitalocene, Necrocene, Anthropocene: Work, Life, & Power in the (Un)Making of Our Capitalogenic World-Ecology

2:00 pm | Open Grounds

Capitalocene, Necrocene, Anthropocene: Work, Life, & Power in the (Un)Making of Our Capitalogenic World-Ecology

Jason W. Moore

Department of Sociology, Binghamton University

FRIDAY, November, 18

2:00 PM 

OPEN GROUNDS 

Where and when do we find the origins of planetary crisis in the 21st century? One’s response to the question shapes the narratives, analytics, and politics of global environmental change. In this talk, environmental historian Jason W. Moore questions the dominant narrative of the Popular Anthropocene that identifies the nineteenth century’s Industrial Revolution as the origins of today’s crisis. He argues instead that the Anthropocene is the Capitalocene – the epoch-making relations of “the” Industrial Revolution were forged much earlier, when modern relations of power, knowledge, and capital expanded rapidly in the centuries after 1450. Their most dramatic expression was a landscape revolution unknown since the dawn of agriculture, reshaping human and extra-human natures at a scale, scope, and speed unthinkable in pre-capitalist civilizations. This dramatic transition cannot be explained through the activity of the “human enterprise” – modern environmental history is driven by capitalogenic – not anthropogenic – forces. Moore argues for seeing the modern world as a world-ecology of power, capital, and nature. In this, modernity’s creativity and destructiveness unfolds through the capacity to channel the paid and unpaid work/energy of humans and the rest of nature in service to endless capital accumulation. That capacity – to find and re/produce Cheap Natures – is now in question.

Jason W. Moore, an environmental historian and historical geographer, is associate professor of Sociology at Binghamton University. He is author of several books, mostly recently Capitalism in the Web of Life (Verso, 2015), Ecologia-mondo e crisi del capitalismo: La fine della natura a buon mercato (Ombre Corte, 2015), and editor of Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature, History, and the Crisis of Capitalism (PM Press, 2016). He coordinates the World-Ecology Research Network and blogs at https://jasonwmoore.wordpress.com/. Moore is completing Seven Cheap Things: A World-Ecological Manifesto (with Raj Patel) and Ecology and the Rise of Capitalism, both for the University of California Press.

Friday, November 18, 2016

2:00 pm | Open Grounds

“Echoes of the Great Terror: Soviet Perpetrators on Trial, 1939-1943″: An International Conference at the University of Virginia

“Echoes of the Great Terror: Soviet Perpetrators on Trial, 1939-1943″: An International Conference at the University of Virginia

September 30 - October 1 2016

Offering new perspectives on Stalin’s Great Terror of 1937-38 and, specifically, the role of the perpetrator in Stalin’s USSR, this conference features presentations in Russian and English based on previously unexamined Ukrainian and Georgian archival sources by historians based in Russia, Ukraine, the Republic of Georgia, Moldova, Germany, Canada, and the United States. Participants in the conference include:

Timothy Blauvelt (Ilia State University, Republic of Georgia)

Igor Casu (Center for the Study of Totalitarianism; State University of Moldova)

Olga Dovbnya, Serhii Kokin, Roman Podkur, and Valeriy Vasylyev (National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine)

Marc Junge (Ruhr-Universität, Bochum, Germany)

Andriy Kohut (State Archives, Security Service of Ukraine)

Nikita Petrov (“Memorial” International Human Rights and Humanitarian Society, Russia)

Jeffrey Rossman (Corcoran Department of History, University of Virginia)

Andrei Savin (Institute of History, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia)

David Shearer (Department of History, University of Delaware)

Aleksandr Vatlin (Department of Modern and Contemporary History, Moscow State University, Russia)

Lynne Viola (University of Toronto, Canada)

Vadym Zolotaryov (Kharkiv National University of Radioelectronics, Ukraine)

 


The primary language of the conference is Russian. Summary translation of the Russian-language presentations into English will be provided.


Please visit the CREEES website (virginia.edu/creees) for a detailed schedule.

For questions, please contact Anna Maxwell (ask4mm@virginia.edu)

Organized by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (CREEES) with co-sponsorship from the Page-Barbour Fund, the Corcoran Department of History, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and the Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation.

Friday, September 30, 2016 to Saturday, October 1, 2016

CREEES talk: P. Kosicki - "More than a Metonym: Katyń and the Future of Public History in Poland"

CREEES talk: P. Kosicki - "More than a Metonym: Katyń and the Future of Public History in Poland"

10:00 am | Nau 211

Please join us on Friday, April 22, at 10:00 a.m. in Nau 211 for a talk by Piotr H. Kosicki titled 

"More than a Metonym: Katyń and the Future of Public History in Poland"

 

Piotr H. Kosicki is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Maryland. His academic writings have appeared, among others, in Contemporary European History, East European Politics and Societies, and Modern Intellectual History. He has also written for Eurozine, The Nation, The New Republic, and The TLS. He is a past recipient of fellowships from the ACLS, the Fulbright Commission, the Republic of France, the Hoover Institution, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the German Historical Institute in Warsaw. He is the author of two monographs forthcoming in Polish, as well as Catholics on the Barricades: Poland, France, and “Revolution,” 1939-1956 (forthcoming with Yale UP).

Light refreshments will be served.

 

This event is free and open to the public. Organized by the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies as part of the UVA Polish Lecture Series, which was funded by the Rosenstiel Foundation and the American Institute of Polish Culture. Co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, the Corcoran Department of Historythe Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, and the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture.

Thursday, April 14, 2016

10:00 am | Nau 211

Cross Lecture - Gary Gallagher - "All About Us: Projection, Wishful Thinking, and Anachronism in Recent Civil War Scholarship"

Cross Lecture - Gary Gallagher - "All About Us: Projection, Wishful Thinking, and Anachronism in Recent Civil War Scholarship"

3:30pm | Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library Auditorium

Please join the Corcoran Department of History at the Cross Lecture:

Gary W. Gallagher, John L. Nau III Professor of History
'All About Us: Projection, Wishful Thinking, and Anachronism in Recent Civil War Scholarship' 
3:30 pm Wednesday, April 13
Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library Auditorium 
Reception to follow.

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

3:30pm | Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library Auditorium

Kosciuszko Documentary Film Screening

Kosciuszko Documentary Film Screening

5:00 - 7:00pm | Monroe Hall 130

Kosciuszko: A Man Ahead of His Time

Documentary film screening

Written and directed by Alex Storozynski

Thursday, April 7, 2016, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Monroe Hall 130

The screening will be followed by a talk by Alex Storozynski and a Q&A with the audience.

Thursday, April 7, 2016

5:00 - 7:00pm | Monroe Hall 130

NASU Second Annual Native American Powwow

NASU Second Annual Native American Powwow

10:00 am - 5:00 pm | Hereford Lawn

Saturday, April 2 at 10 AM - 5 PM

Hereford Lawn 2400 Stadium Rd

Come celebrate Native American culture with a day of food, dance, and music! Join the University of Virginia's Native American Student Union (NASU) at the 2nd annual spring powwow on April 2nd. Don't miss the Grand Entrance at noon! Enjoy drum performances by Yapatoko along with Zotigh Singers and dance performances led by Aaron Winston and Debora Moore. UVA catering and vendors will be selling food throughout the event. 

A huge thank you to the IDEA Grant and College Council whose generous sponsorship and support has made this event possible!

Saturday, April 2, 2016

10:00 am - 5:00 pm | Hereford Lawn

Linking the Ancient World

Linking the Ancient World

10:00am | Alderman 421

Scholars' Lab

Sarah Bond, University of Virginia

"Linking the Ancient World: Pleiades Workshop with Sarah Bond"

Tuesday, March 15, 10:00 am

Alderman 421

At this workshop, Associate editor Sarah Bond will introduce the Pleiades community to participants. She will walk them through the history and layout of the gazetteer, discuss the popular contribution and review of our linked geodata, and then help participants make a map of sites within the ancient Mediterranean. Persons at all levels of experience (from "interested" to "expert") are welcome to participate.

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

10:00am | Alderman 421

TODAY: History DMP info session

TODAY: History DMP info session

4:00 - 5:00PM | Gibson 242

MAKE HISTORY GREAT AGAIN!  
History Distinguished Majors Program Information session

MARCH 17, 4-5pm GIBSON 242 

DMP director and professor of history Brian Balogh,

along with current History DMPs will answer

your questions about the program.

Thursday, March 17, 2016

4:00 - 5:00PM | Gibson 242

The Washingtons: George and Martha

The Washingtons: George and Martha

7:00 pm | University of Virginia, Minor Hall 125

Presented by the University of Virginia’s Washington Papers and Corcoran Department of History, join writer and historical biographer Flora Fraser as she discusses her new book The Washingtons, a portrait of the marriage of George and Martha Washington, and how their partnership led a nation.

The lecture will be held on February 8 at 7:00 p.m. in Minor Hall 125 on the grounds of the University of Virginia.

For more information about the author and her new book, visitflorafraser.com.

Monday, February 8, 2016

7:00 pm | University of Virginia, Minor Hall 125

Congressional briefing on the history of political partisanship in the United States

Congressional briefing on the history of political partisanship in the United States

10:00 am | Cannon House Office Building, Room 121, Washington, DC

The National History Center of the American Historical Association cordially invites you to a Congressional briefing onthe history of political partisanship in the United States.

The briefing will examine the evolving nature of partisanship from the antebellum period to the present.

Presenters:
Brian Balogh, Professor of History at the Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia

Joanne Freeman, Professor of History and American Studies at Yale University

Moderator:
Donald A. Ritchie, Historian Emeritus of the Senate

Friday, January 29, 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM

Cannon House Office Building, Room 121

Washington, DC

Questions and answers will follow the presentation.

Light refreshments will be served.
RSVP to Amanda Moniz at amoniz@historians.org.

For more information, please see our website.

Friday, January 29, 2016

10:00 am | Cannon House Office Building, Room 121, Washington, DC

The Legacy of Charles W. McCurdy

The Legacy of Charles W. McCurdy

6:00 pm | The Miller Center and Caplin Pavilion

A conference exploring the legacy of Charles McCurdy, a prominent legal history professor who recently retired, will feature scholars discussing his work and cutting-edge topics in the field.  The conference also serves to inaugurate the Charles W. McCurdy Fellowship in Legal History at the Miller Center and School of Law.
 
"During a 40-year career in the Corcoran Department of History and the School of Law, Charles McCurdy has been the intellectual and pedagogical heart of legal history at the University of Virginia," said UVA law professor Risa Goluboff, a legal history scholar who is co-organizing the conference.
 
McCurdy's scholarship earned him the 2003 Order of the Coif Triennial Book Award for “The Anti-Rent Era in New York Law and Politics, 1839-1865.” His teaching has earned him not only official recognition, but also claim to having directed or advised more than 200 doctoral dissertations, master’s theses and undergraduate theses.
 
Sunday and Monday, Nov. 1-2 
The Miller Center and Caplin Pavilion 
Sponsored by the Miller Center, UVA's Corcoran Department of History, and UVA Law 
 
 

Sunday, November 1, 2015 to Monday, November 2, 2015

6:00 pm | The Miller Center and Caplin Pavilion

AIA Lecture: Malcolm Bell III "A Sicilian Greek Agora"

AIA Lecture: Malcolm Bell III "A Sicilian Greek Agora"

5:30 pm | 158 Campbell

The Charlottesville Society of the Archaeological Institute of America was founded 50 years ago and held its first lecture on October 15, 1965.  The September 30th lecture will celebrate the founding and the first lecture.  

 
The Art Department played a role in the founding of the C’ville AIA Society in that David Lawall, then on the Art Department faculty, was one of the founding members, as was his wife, Willa.  (David is now retired having been director of the Museum some time ago).  Willa Lawall still attends every AIA lecture and will make a few brief remarks about the founding.
 
This occassion is, however, a triple celebration!  2015 is the 60th anniversary of the Morgantina Excavations!  The last 35 of those years have been associated with the University of Virginia, with Malcolm Bell as Director, a cause for celebration in its own right.  
Professor Bell is this year's Norton Lecturer for the AIA.  The Norton Lectureship is one of the three most distinguished lectureships within the AIA (including the Joukowski and the Kress).  
 
In addition, at the January 2016 General Meeting, the AIA will award its Gold Medal for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement to Malcolm Bell.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

5:30 pm | 158 Campbell

McCurdy Legacy - A Conference

McCurdy Legacy - A Conference

6:00 pm | The Miller Center and Caplin Pavilion

Sponsored by the University of Virginia Miller Center, the School of Law and the Corcoran Department of History

This conference will celebrate and explore the legacy of Charles W. McCurdy on a scholarly and personal level. It will also serve to inaugurate the Charles W. McCurdy Fellowship in Legal History at the Miller Center and School of Law. During a 40-year career in the Corcoran Department of History and the School of Law, McCurdy has been the intellectual and pedagogical heart of legal history at the University of Virginia. His scholarship earned him the 2003 Order of the Coif Triennial Book Award for “The Anti-Rent Era in New York Law and Politics, 1839-1865.” His teaching has earned him not only official recognition but, more importantly, claim to having directed or advised more than 200 doctoral dissertations, master’s theses, and undergraduate theses. 

For more information, to RSVP, and to see the schedule, please visit:

UVA Law School's conference page

Sunday, November 1, 2015 to Monday, November 2, 2015

6:00 pm | The Miller Center and Caplin Pavilion

History in the Present - Denise Spellberg - "Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an: Islam and the Founders"

History in the Present - Denise Spellberg - "Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an: Islam and the Founders"

4:00 pm | Auditorium of the Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library

Tuesday, April 28, 4pm in the Auditorium of the Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library, Denise A. Spellberg, Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin, will present "Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an: Islam and the Founders" ast part of the History in the Present: Perspectives on the Middle East 2014-15 Lecture Series.

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

4:00 pm | Auditorium of the Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library

Cross Lecture - Elizabeth Meyer - "The Obligations of Freed People in Early Roman Greece"

Cross Lecture - Elizabeth Meyer - "The Obligations of Freed People in Early Roman Greece"

3:30 pm | Auditorium of the Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library

Wednesday, April 22, 3:30 pm in the Auditorium of the Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library, Elizabeth Meyer, T. Cary Johnson, Jr. Professor of History in the Department, will present 'The Obligations of Freed People in Early Roman Greece.' Reception to follow.

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

3:30 pm | Auditorium of the Harrison Institute Small Special Collections Library

SURVIVORS INTO MINORITIES: ARMENIANS IN POST-­GENOCIDE TURKEY

SURVIVORS INTO MINORITIES: ARMENIANS IN POST-­GENOCIDE TURKEY

5:00 - 6:30 pm | Clark 108

Tuesday, March 24, 5-6:30pm in Clark 108
Lerna Ekmekcioglu, MIT Associate Professor of History will present "Survivors into Minorities: Armenians in Post-Genocide Turkey" (panel discussion to follow)

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

5:00 - 6:30 pm | Clark 108

Where is China? Where is Tibet?

Where is China? Where is Tibet?

5:00 pm | Minor Hall, Room 125

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

5:00 pm | Minor Hall, Room 125

20th Century US History Workshop

20th Century US History Workshop

2:00 pm | Nau 342

The 20th Century Workshop will meet to discuss Benji Cohen and Erik Erlandson's prospectuses. (Please see their abstracts below).  

Benji Cohen: "Outsourcing Democracy: The Neoliberalization of Washington, D.C.'s Public Schools, 1970-2014"

 

My dissertation chronicles a radical transformation in urban public education over the last forty years. Focusing on Washington, D.C., I demonstrate the process by which the school system adopted neoliberal education policies. A reform coalition made up of both Republicans and Democrats, business leaders, and independent policy entrepreneurs, managed to take control of Washington’s public schools, emphasizing privatization, choice, efficiency, competition, and the free-market. This shift from traditional public schooling to a neoliberal model has manifested itself through new models like vouchers and charterization, the emergence of non-public influences like Teach for America (TFA), and the reliance upon high-stakes standardized tests

 

Erik Erlandson: "Redesigning the State: Federal Courts and the Emergence of Reagan's Deregulatory Bureaucracy"

 

My dissertation explores how lawyers, judges, executive officials, and other political actors transformed the legal mechanics of the administrative state to help bring about deregulation in the 1980s and 1990s. Administrative law, the body of legal rules that governs the bureaucracy, had been dominated by overzealous courts in the preceding two decades. Inspired by the idea that agencies were prone to “capture” by regulated interests and could not be granted broad discretionary authority, federal courts forcefully intervened in the administrative process to ensure that agencies remained accountable to the public writ large. They did so by foisting on administrators an array of new procedural requirements. But judicially-enforced “interest representation” only increased regulatory obligations, and thus clashed with new and wildly popular neoliberal ideas like deregulation. If agencies were to retreat from the private sector and regulate less, courts would have to stop demanding more and more of them.

“Redesigning the State” thus argues that conservative legal thinkers had to empower the bureaucracy vis-à-vis the courts in order to liberate different sectors of the economy. Bureaucratic discretion and deregulation were strange bedfellows because, after years of judicial oversight that amplified administrative obligations, Republican agency staffers desperately needed institutional independence to move in a different direction. Administrators needed courts that would defer to their expertise. In the 1980s a spate of new legal doctrines pushed courts and administrative law in this deferential direction. These doctrines would allow agencies like the Federal Reserve, FTC, and EPA, for instance, to weaken regulatory programs through heightened bureaucratic capacities. On its face deregulation refers to the removal of the state from the private sector, but my project shows that administrative power and market liberalization are not necessarily at odds. The realities of regulation are more complicated than the convenient dichotomy between “markets” and “government” might suggest.

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

2:00 pm | Nau 342

20th Century US History Workshop

20th Century US History Workshop

2:00 - 3:30pm | Nau 342

Meaghan Beadle and Justin McBrien will present their dissertation prospecti. 

Abstracts:

 Meaghan Beadle: TBA

Justin McBrien: "Making the World Safe for Disaster: Cold War Science, Crisis, Environmentalism, and the Globalization of Catastrophe, 1945-1970"

 My dissertation examines how Americans conceived global environmental risks during the early Cold War era, arguing that an emergent discourse of planetary catastrophism collapsed the distinction between anthropogenic and natural disasters and created a narrative of humanity in a fight against extinction. This frame gives a more synthetic perspective on the relationship between the rise of the military-industrial complex, international modernization programs, and global environmentalism. The concept of planetary catastrophism allowed for the formation of what I call the “Biosecurity State,” an idea of governance premised upon the threat of global environmental risks induced by modern industrial technologies and the promise to contain these threats through rational application of scientific knowledge. Yet in an age of unprecedented technological development and the deep uncertainty regarding its impact on the planet, speculative predictions of potential disasters frequently hid behind a veneer of objective analysis. This uncertainty justified the emergency mentality of the early Cold War state as well as a new crisis-oriented environmentalism embodied in Silent Spring.  While often in direct conflict with one another, environmental and social scientists both inside and outside the national security apparatus forged a narrative of the human being as a planetary actor in a fragile system we were threatening to annihilate, a strange paradox of increasing power at the price of increasing vulnerability. This dialectic was nowhere more apparent than in problems concerning the atmosphere during the 1950s, when disputes over weather modification, smog, climate change, nuclear testing, and arid land development converged on the issue of who possessed the right to determine acceptable risks for billions of people across the globe. The experiences of these controversies would influence both expert and public perspectives on the necessity of international modernization programs, effectively globalizing catastrophe in belief and practice.  As the acceleration of global capitalist production intensified resource depletion and ecological degradation, concerns about ensuring the continued stability of the system produced the concept of "sustainable" development. Scientific experts promoted the idea of the Biosecurity State as a solution to the risks precipitated by globalization, declaring that only they possessed the power to make the world safe for disaster.

Friday, December 5, 2014

2:00 - 3:30pm | Nau 342

Southern Seminar with Sarah Milov.

Southern Seminar with Sarah Milov.

12:00 pm | Nau 441

The Southern Seminar is open to faculty and graduate students from any department. We will meet informally over lunch to hear Professor Milov give a presentation on her recent research; please rsvp to Varon (evaron@virginia.edu) or Hale (gh5x@virginia.edu), as lunch will be provided. 

Thursday, December 4, 2014

12:00 pm | Nau 441

Thomas Jefferson and the Problem of Union

Thomas Jefferson and the Problem of Union

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm | Miller Center

GARY W. GALLAGHER is the John L. Nau III Professor in the History of the American Civil War at the University of Virginia. He earned his graduate degrees from the University of Texas at Austin. He has published widely in the field of Civil War-era history, most recently Causes Won, Lost and Forgotten: How Hollywood and Popular Art Shape What We Know about the Civil War, The Union War, and Becoming Confederates: Paths to a New National Loyalty. In 2010-2012, he held the Cavaliers' Distinguished Teaching Professorship, the highest teaching award conveyed by the University.

PETER ONUF is senior fellow at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation Professor of History, Emeritus at the University of Virginia. He is author/editor of eleven books, including most recently, Nations, Markets, and War: Modern History and the American Civil War. In 2008-09, he was the Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth Professor of American History at the University of Oxford. He is also the “18th Century Guy” on the public radio program BackStory with the American History Guys.

This event is part of…

The Historical Presidency Series: Organized by Gary W. Gallagher, renowned U.Va. history professor and Miller Center senior faculty associate, the inaugural 2013-2014 Historical Presidency series will examine executive leadership during a particularly calamitous period in our nation’s history.

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm | Miller Center

History of African Americans at UVA tour

History of African Americans at UVA tour

4:00 pm | Special Collections Library

The University Guide Service's monthly History of African Americans tour is this Friday, November 21 at 4pm starting from the Special Collections Library. The tour should last about 75 minutes and will cover the history of African Americans at UVA from slavery through the present day. All are welcome!

Friday, November 21, 2014

4:00 pm | Special Collections Library

The Grand Strategy of Ronald Reagan

The Grand Strategy of Ronald Reagan

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm | Miller Center

Panel with Hal Brands, Malcolm Byrne, James Graham Wilson

http://millercenter.org/events/2014/the-grand-strategy-of-ronald-reagan 

This event will be webcast live.

Ronald Reagan has been hailed as one of the nation’s most successful presidents in the realm of foreign affairs. Though he came into office with harsh views of the Soviet Union, he found a way to reach out to the Russians and build a relationship with Mikhail Gorbachev that began to unwind the Cold War. But scholars continue to debate whether Reagan was following a carefully mapped out strategy. Were his foreign policy moves improvised or part of a grand plan? And how did the crises he faced during his time in office, especially Iran-Contra, impact his ability to conduct foreign policy? The Miller Center’s GREAT ISSUES series will kick off a lively debate with three experts on the Reagan years, including HAL BRANDS, assistant professor of History and Public Policy at Duke University; MALCOLM BYRNE, deputy director and director of research at the nongovernmental National Security Archive at George Washington University; and JAMES GRAHAM WILSONfrom the Office of the Historian at the U.S. Department of State.

This event is part of…

The Great Issues Series: Under the direction of Miller Center scholar and Associate Professor of Public Policy Guian McKee, the Great Issues program provides scholarly expertise on a wide range of policy issues for the public, the media, and the policy community, with an aim towards increasing public discourse about national and global challenges.

Monday, November 17, 2014

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm | Miller Center

"The Republic of Georgia: Trying to Become a Normal Democratic State" Tedo Japaridze

"The Republic of Georgia: Trying to Become a Normal Democratic State" Tedo Japaridze

2:00 pm | Newcomb Hall Commonwealth Room

Tedo Japaridze Lecture

•Chair of the Georgian Parliamentary Committee for Foreign Affairs (2012-present)

•Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Georgia to USA, Canada, and Mexico (1994-2002)

•Minister of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Georgia (2003-2004)

Monday, November 10, 2014

2:00 pm | Newcomb Hall Commonwealth Room

Film Screening of "Rebel" with director Maria Agui Carter

Film Screening of "Rebel" with director Maria Agui Carter

6:00 pm - 8:00 pm | Minor Hall 125

The filmmaker Maria Agui Carter will screen and discuss her documentary on the female Civil War soldier Loreta Janeta Velasquez. 

http://itvs.org/films/rebel

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

6:00 pm - 8:00 pm | Minor Hall 125

Rock and the Wall: American Music as Rebellion in East Germany

Rock and the Wall: American Music as Rebellion in East Germany

5:30 pm | Auditorium of the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

The hammer blows that brought the Berlin Wall crashing down were preceded by a rock-and-roll powered “sonic boom” – a series of legendary concerts in the late 1980’s. Grace Hale, U.Va. Professor of History and the Director of the American Studies Program, will focus on the “Concert for Berlin,” a show held in the West but designed to be heard far over the wall, and Bruce Springsteen’s unforgettable 1988 East Berlin show. In addition, Hale will examine how East Germans understood and responded to American rock as the product of African American and working class white rebellion – going back to the folk-blues tours in their homeland in the 1960’s and 1970’s and Bob Dylan’s East Berlin concert in 1987.

Monday, November 3, 2014

5:30 pm | Auditorium of the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

IHGC Event"--Religion and the University"

IHGC Event"--Religion and the University"

9:00 am - 7:30 pm | Open Grounds

Several of our graduate students and professors will be involved in an Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures event this Friday, October 31st at Open Grounds, on "Religion and the University." 

9-10:30 am: The Religious/Secular Foundations of Public Education
Panelists: Richard Barnett, Department of History; Scott Harrop, Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures; Chad Wellmon, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures
Discussant: Kimberly Hursh, Department of History 

10:30-11 am: Coffee and light refreshments

11 am- 12:30 pm: Public University and Religious Expression
Panelists: Douglas Laycock, School of Law; Matthew S. Hedstrom, Department of Religious Studies; Philip Lorish, Department of Religious Studies; Brian Owensby, Department of History
Discussant: Swati Chawla, Department of History 

12:30-2 pm: Lunch (provided to all attendees)

2-3:30 pm: The Study of Religion in the Academy
Panelists: Ahmed al-Rahim, Department of Religious Studies; Kathleen Flake, Department of Religious Studies; Karen Lang, Department of Religious Studies; Charles Mathewes, Department of Religious Studies
Discussant: Nauman Faizi, Department of Religious Studies 

3:30-4 pm: Coffee and light refreshments

4-5:30 pm-Lessons from Other Spaces
Panelists: Scott Bailey, Scholars’ Lab and Department of Religious Studies; Purdom Lindblad, Scholars’ Lab; Xiaoyuan Liu, Department of History; Geeta Patel, Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures
Discussant: Emily Matson, Department of History

Friday, October 31, 2014

9:00 am - 7:30 pm | Open Grounds

Lecture by Marcello Carastro--"Spoken and Written Words: Comparative Thoughts on Greek Divination"

Lecture by Marcello Carastro--"Spoken and Written Words: Comparative Thoughts on Greek Divination"

5:00 pm | Cocke Hall, Gibson Room

"Spoken and Written Words: Comparative Thoughts on Greek Divination"
Lecture by Marcello Carastro

5:00 p.m. Thurs., October 30, Cocke Hall-Gibson Room

Last of 3 Lectures

Thursday, October 30, 2014

5:00 pm | Cocke Hall, Gibson Room

“Beyond Socialist Realism: Rethinking Art and Politics in the Soviet Bloc”

“Beyond Socialist Realism: Rethinking Art and Politics in the Soviet Bloc”

1:15 pm | Nau 342

“Beyond Socialist Realism: Rethinking Art and Politics in the Soviet Bloc”

Dr. Kyrill Kunakhovich, Dept. of History, William and Mary College

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

1:15 pm | Nau 342

Andrew Johnson’s Impeachment and the Legacy of the Civil War

Andrew Johnson’s Impeachment and the Legacy of the Civil War

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm | Miller Center

Elizabeth R. Varon 
October 28, 2014
3:30PM - 5:00PM (EDT)

Miller Center

ELIZABETH VARON is Langbourne M. Williams Professor of American History at the University of Virginia. A noted Civil War historian, she is the author of Disunion!: The Coming of the American Civil War, 1789–1859We Mean to be Counted: White Women and Politics in Antebellum Virginia; and Southern Lady, Yankee Spy: The True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, A Union Agent in the Heart of the Confederacy, which was deemed one of the "Five best books about the Civil War away from the battlefield" by the Wall Street Journal.

This event is part of…

The Historical Presidency Series: Organized by Gary W. Gallagher, renowned U.Va. history professor and Miller Center senior faculty associate, the inaugural 2013-2014 Historical Presidency series will examine executive leadership during a particularly calamitous period in our nation’s history.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm | Miller Center

Shining Bonds: Agalmata in Archaic Greece

Shining Bonds: Agalmata in Archaic Greece

5:00 pm | Cocke Hall, Gibson Room

Shining Bonds: Agalmata in Archaic Greece

Marcello Carastro

Ecole des hautes etudes en sciences sociales, Paris

Thursday, Oct. 9th at 5:00

Cocke Hall, Gibson Room

Thursday, October 9, 2014

5:00 pm | Cocke Hall, Gibson Room

Amb. Ryan Crocker on the U.S. & Iran

Amb. Ryan Crocker on the U.S. & Iran

7:00 pm | Newcomb Hall Ballroom

AMBASSADOR RYAN CROCKER: The United States and Iran: 

Where Are We Heading?

Tuesday, February 11          7:00-8:30 p.m.

Location: Newcomb Hall Ballroom ( U.Va. Web Map)

 The Miller Center and the International Relations Organization at U.Va. will co-host a lecture with AMBASSADOR RYAN CROCKER on the interim nuclear deal with Iran, and the prospects for peace with the U.S. and greater stability in the Middle East.

 Ambassador Crocker is the preeminent American diplomat to the Middle East, a former U.S. ambassador to Iraq and Afghanistan, and the 2013 James R. Schlesinger Distinguished Professor at the Miller Center. He holds the U.S. Foreign Service’s highest rank, serving as U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan from 2011 to 2012, ambassador to Iraq from 2007 to 2009, and  ambassador to Pakistan, Syria, Kuwait, and Lebanon. In 2009, President George W. Bush awarded Crocker the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award.

 A question-and-answer session will follow this lecture. 

 Check out the Facebook page for this event, and let us know if you plan to attend here.  

 RSVPs are not required, but VIP seating is available by request. Email gage@virginia.edu to reserve your front-row seat for this lecture!

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

7:00 pm | Newcomb Hall Ballroom

Fall Job Market Meeting

Fall Job Market Meeting

3:30 pm | Nau 396

As Mr. Halliday is the placement director for our department, he is here to help you navigate the academic job search process. Many of you he knows, others he hopes to get to know soon.

We begin with a meeting together: 1:30 p.m., Friday, September 17. This will take place in the grad student lounge/study room: Nau 396. Students who will not be on the job market this year, but are curious about the basics, are quite welcome to attend

At this meeting, I will discuss the job application calendar and the things others in the department and I can do to help you. I will also try to answer your questions.

If you would, please send me an email message telling me:

a) whether you plan to be on the job market this year, and would like my help (whether or not you are now in C'ville);

b) whether you plan to attend the meeting; and

c) your stage (ABD—with likely time to completion—or degree in hand; if the latter, please state your current job situation, including number of years on the market).

We have a section devoted to job placement on our department web pages: http://www.virginia.edu/history/graduate/placement. You must be logged in to use this portion of the site (the department page login is by Netbadge: please see Loren if you have questions about this). This section has useful information about the job search process and links to other resources. The OAH, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and other places contain useful advice and information. The AHA site is especially good: http://www.historians.org/grads/JobMarket.cfm. Some of you may also be familiar with the Academic Jobs Wiki, which is better for gossip and griping than good advice: http://academicjobs.wikia.com/wiki/History_2010-2011. H-Net’s Job Guide and the AHA’s Perspectives and its website are probably the two most important sources for advertisements of job openings.

If you have not done so already, you should begin immediately to draft the elements most application packages contain: a cover letter, your c.v., and separate statements on your teaching and your research. These statements should be brief (1-2 pages, single-spaced, though adding a space between paragraphs for readability).

Commenting on your letter and c.v. is probably the most important thing I can do to help you. I cannot overemphasize how important a good letter is for your search. You should write and re-write it many times, always looking for ways to tighten it while giving the statement of your work’s significance greater force. You should ask your adviser to comment on one or more versions. I will do so, too. I will have more to say about this in our meeting. I will also discuss mock interviewing and job talks, among other topics. I look forward to seeing you then.

Finally, if you know a graduate student or recent graduate who has not received this message but intends to be on the job market, please let her or him know about this meeting. Please feel free to contact me with any questions.

Friday, September 17, 2010

3:30 pm | Nau 396

Woodman Seminar

Woodman Seminar

1:00 pm | Nau 441

Following Dr. Woodman's talk on the 13th, he will be offering a research seminar to interested faculty and graduate students:

'Working with Anglo-Saxon Charters'
Friday, April 16th 1:00-3:30
Nau 441

Supporting materials for this workshop are accessible through the Medieval Studies Research Seminar page:

http://www.virginia.edu/medievalstudies/ressem.html

 Dr. Woodman is British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Research Fellow at Robinson College, Cambridge. His research focuses upon the intersection of law and politics in the Anglo-Saxon period, the analysis of charters, the history of Northumbria, and historical writing, in particular the _Historia Regum_ attributed to Symeon of Durham. He is currently completing his major edition of the pre-Conquest charters of the northern religious houses, to be published by the British Academy and OUP.

Friday, April 16, 2010

1:00 pm | Nau 441

Roger Cartier Workshop

Roger Cartier Workshop

4:00 pm | Nau 341

The History Dept. will be co-sponsoring a seminar--open to faculty and graduate students--on a precirculated paper by Prof. Chartier. The paper, entitled "The Author's Hand," is attached.

Thursday, April 1, 2010

4:00 pm | Nau 341

Dubois Workshop

Dubois Workshop

Graduate Student workshop with Laurent Dubois

Monday, March 29, 2010

2010-2010 Financial Aid Forms Due

2010-2010 Financial Aid Forms Due

You can find the form and more information here. The form must be completed electronically, no long hand will be accepted. The form must be submitted by April 1st to Mr Dimberg.

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Fall 2010 Graduate Course Registration Begins

Fall 2010 Graduate Course Registration Begins

Monday, April 5, 2010

Temma Kaplan Workshop

Temma Kaplan Workshop

10:00 am | Nau Hall 441

Ms. Kaplan will lead a graduate student workshop the day following her talk on women, water, and environmental activism.

Friday, March 19, 2010

10:00 am | Nau Hall 441

GHSA Spring Luncheon

GHSA Spring Luncheon

1:00 pm | Nau 396

Many of you are in the throes of comps season, and we of the GHSA would like to offer you respite, if only for a moment. Join us tomorrow (Friday, 19 March) in Nau 396 from 1:00 to 3:00 for a Spring Luncheon for sandwiches (both meat and veggie options from Take It Away), drinks and refreshments.

Spring is *finally* here, and it's time for us to embrace it.

Friday, March 19, 2010

1:00 pm | Nau 396

Final French Reading Exam

Final French Reading Exam

The final French Graduate Reading Exam of the year will be given next Friday, April 16th. If you wish to take this exam, you need to REGISTER by 4 p.m. THIS FRIDAY, APRIL 9th. This will be the last opportunity to take the exam this school year.

For registration information, please see the following website:
http://www.virginia.edu/french/grads/exams/exams_update.htm

Friday, April 16, 2010

Submission of Thesis / Dissertation Title Page

Submission of Thesis / Dissertation Title Page

Last day for submitting an unsigned copy of thesis or dissertation title page for May 2010.

Email your unsigned title page to the department secretary (mja4f@virginia.edu) - if any changes are made to your title page between April 1 and May 1, please email the changes as well.
Sample Title Page

Thursday, April 1, 2010

Doctoral Dissertations and Master's Theses due for May 2010

Doctoral Dissertations and Master's Theses due for May 2010

Monday, May 3, 2010

Course Final Examinations

Course Final Examinations

Thursday, May 6, 2010 to Friday, May 14, 2010

Classes End

Classes End

Tuesday, May 4, 2010

Foreign Student Applications for Admission

Foreign Student Applications for Admission

Last day for filing foreign student applications for admission for Fall Semester 2010.

Thursday, April 1, 2010

Course Enrollment Begins via SIS for Fall Semester 2010

Course Enrollment Begins via SIS for Fall Semester 2010

Tentative Date

Monday, March 29, 2010

Classes Resume

Classes Resume

Monday, March 15, 2010

Spring Recess

Spring Recess

Saturday, March 6, 2010 to Sunday, March 14, 2010