Nicholas Wood

Nicholas Wood

PhD Candidate (ABD)

Adjunct Instructor

Advisor: Peter S. Onuf

Email: npw3c (at) virginia.edu

Fields & Specialties

Slavery and Abolitionism in the early republic

EDUCATION_________________________________________________________________________________

Ph.D.  American History: University of Virginia, December 2013
            (passed dissertation defense on September 23, 2013)
            Advisor: Peter S. Onuf
            Dissertation: “Considerations of Humanity and Expediency: The Slave Trades and
            African Colonization in the Early National Antislavery Movement”

M.A.  American History: Rutgers University, Camden, May 2007
            Advisor: Andrew S. Shankman
            Thesis: “Non-Importation not Abolition: The Importance of Commercial Language in the
            United States Prohibition of the African Slave Trade”

M.Ed. Social Studies Education: Rutgers University, New Brunswick, May 2003

B.A. History: Rutgers University, New Brunswick, May 2002
            Advisor: Christopher L. Brown
            Honors Program Thesis: “No Man Can Serve Two Masters: The Dilemma of Wesleyan- 
            Methodist Missionaries in Pre-Emancipation Jamaica”

PUBLICATIONS______________________________________________________________________________

JOURNAL ARTICLES

“‘A Sacrifice on the Altar of Slavery:’ Doughface Politics and Black Disenfranchisement in Pennsylvania, 1837-1838,” Journal of the Early Republic 31 (Spring 2011):75-105

“John Randolph and the Politics of Slavery in the Early Republic,” Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 120 (Summer 2012):106-143

WORKS IN PROGRESS

“The Missouri Crisis and the ‘Changed Object’ of the American Colonization Society,” in Reconsiderations and Redirections in the Study of African Colonization, eds. Beverly C. Tomek and Matthew J. Hetrick
(currently under consideration by the University Press of Florida)

 “A Mulatto’s Dinner at Monticello: The Jefferson Image, Race Science, and Antislavery Violence in Jabez D. Hammond’s Abolitionist Fiction”
(“revise and resubmit”)

BOOK REVIEWS

Colonization and Its Discontents: Emancipation, Emigration, and Antislavery in Antebellum Pennsylvania, by Beverly C. Tomek, in Pennsylvania History 79 (Spring 2012):252-54

Slaves for Hire: Renting Enslaved Labor in Antebellum Virginia, by John J. Zaborney, in Journal of the Early Republic 33 (Fall 2013):580-82

The Tie That Bound Us: The Women of John Brown’s Family and the Legacy of Radical Abolitionism, by Bonnie Laughlin-Schultz, in Women’s History Review (forthcoming)

Lucretia Mott's Heresy: Abolition and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America, by Carol Faulkner, in Pennsylvania History (forthcoming)


TEACHING EXPERIENCE_____________________________________________________________

Adjunct Professor, UVA, HIUS 3031: Era of the American Revolution, Spring 2014
Adjunct Instructor, UVA, HIUS 3051: The Age of Jefferson & Jackson, Spring 2013
Teaching Assistant, UVA, HIUS 3051: The Age of Jefferson & Jackson, Spring 2011
Adjunct Instructor, UVA, HIUS 4501: Slavery and Antislavery in America, Fall 2010
Teaching Assistant, UVA,  HIUS 2501: US Military History 1600-1900, Fall 2009
Teaching Assistant, UVA, HIUS 3671: The Civil Rights Movement, Spring 2009
Teaching Assistant, UVA, HIUS 313: Emergence of Modern America, Fall 2008
Instructor, UVA School of Continuing Education, James Monroe Lectures, Fall 2008
High School Teacher, Monroe Township High School, NJ, World History , 2003-2004
High School Teacher, Monroe Township High School, NJ, US History II, 2003-2004

FELLOWSHIPS, GRANTS, AND HONORS_______________________________________________

EXTERNAL AWARDS

McNeil Center for Early American Studies, at the University of Pennsylvania,
Dissertation Fellow, 2011-2012

Huntington Library, San Marino, California, Robert L. Middlekauff Fellowship, June 2012

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, New York City area archive research fellowship, Fall 2011

Library Company of Philadelphia and Historical Society of Pennsylvania, research fellowship, June 2011

Robert H. Smith International Center for Jeffersonian Studies, Charlottesville, VA, research fellowship, October 2010

INTERNAL AWARDS

University of Virginia, Department of History, Writing Fellowship, Fall 2013
UVA-Monticello Early American Seminar, Dissertation Fellow, 2012-2013
University of Virginia, Huskey Travel Fund Award, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013
University of Virginia,  J. Carl Sewell III Fellowship, Spring 2010
University of Virginia, Department  of History, Fellowship, 2007-2010
Rutgers Alumni Award for Academic Achievement, 2007
Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society, 2006
Kappa Delta Pi  International Honor Society in Education, 2003
Rutgers University, History Honors Program, High Honors, 2002

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS_______________________________________________________________

“The Interracial Abolitionist Collaborations of Cato Collins and John Parrish,” presented at the annual meeting of the Pennsylvania Historical Association, Gettysburg, October 19, 2013.  Comment by Beverly Tomek.

“Natural Rights, the Golden Rule, and Divine Retribution in Early National Slave Trade Debates,” presented at the annual meeting of the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture, Baltimore, June 13-15, 2013.  Comment by Christopher L. Brown.

“Barbary Captivity, National Power, and the Defense of Slavery and the Slave Trade,” presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Historical Association, Baltimore, October 2011.  Comment by John Craig Hammond.

“The Eclipse of Moderation:  African Colonization and the Missouri Crisis,” presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Historians of the Early American Republic, Philadelphia, July 2011.  Comment by John Craig Hammond and Eva Sheppard Wolf.

“Transatlantic Abolitionism in the Late Eighteenth Century,” presented at the Virginia Forum, Lexington VA, March 25, 2011.  Comment by the audience.

“Slavery, Security, and Sovereignty in the Orleans Territory, 1803-1812,” presented at the annual meeting of the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture, Oxford, Mississippi, June 13, 2010.  Comment by Anthony Parent.

“‘A Sacrifice on the Altar of Slavery:’ The 1838 Disfranchisement of Black Pennsylvanians,” presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Historians of the Early American Republic, Springfield, Illinois, July 19, 2009.  Comment by Margot Minardi.

“Melbourne’s Dinner at Monticello: Fiction as History and Thomas Jefferson as We Wish He Were,” presented at the annual University of Virginia History Graduate Student Conference, Charlottesville, Virginia, April 19, 2009.  Comment by Whitney Martinko.

“Non-Importation not Abolition: The Importance of Commercial Language in the United States’ Prohibition of the African Slave Trade,” presented at The Closing of the Slave Trades: Transatlantic Perspectives, cosponsored by the Gilder-Lehrman Center and Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland, May 29, 2008.  Comment by David W. Blight and Catherine Clinton.

“‘Sin Against Heaven’ or Commercial Violation? The Language of British and American Prohibition of the Slave Trade,” presented at The Abolition of the British Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade: Telling the Story, College of the Bahamas at Nassau, February 22, 2008.  Comment by Evelyn McCollin.


O
THER PRESENTATIONS____________________________________________________________

“A Mulatto’s Dinner at Monticello: The Jefferson Image, Race Science, and Antislavery Violence in Jabez D. Hammond’s Abolitionist Fiction,” presented at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Early American Republic Seminar, December 6, 2013.

“‘Scenes of the Brightest Heroism’: Slave Resistance and Virtue in Antislavery Thought during the Age of Revolution,” presented at the “The Age of Emancipation: Black Freedom in the Atlantic World” workshop, at Vanderbilt University’s Robert Penn Warren Center, April 26-27, 2013.  Moderated by Richard J.M. Blackett, Teresa A. Goddu, and Jane G. Landers.

“Barbary Slavery, American Freedom: Race, National Power, and Natural Rights in the New Nation,” presented at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, March 23, 2012.  Moderated by Daniel Richter. 

“Questioning the Morality and Expediency of Slavery in Jeffersonian Virginia,” presented as part of the forum, William Short’s Emancipation Proposal to Thomas Jefferson, at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies, May 17, 2011, and televised on CSPAN-3, July 17, 2011.  Comment by Annette Gordon-Reed.

 “John Randolph and the Politics of Slavery in Jeffersonian America,” presented at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies, Fellow’s Forum, October 26, 2010.  Moderated by Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy.


R
ELATED EXPERIENCE AND SERVICE_________________________________________________

Advance Scanning Team, Documents Compass/Founders Online, Summer 2013
Coordinator of the UVA-Monticello Early American Seminar, 2012-2013
Referee, Essays in History, published by the UVA Department of History, 2010-present
Research Assistant, Virginia Center for Digital History, UVA, Summer 2010
Instructor, Saturday Enrichment Program, University of Virginia, January 2010
Graduate Assistant, Summer Transition Program, University of Virginia, Summer 2009
Research Assistant, African-American History, Monticello, Summer 2008
Interpreter, National Constitution Center, Philadelphia, PA, 2004-2007
Tour Guide, History Hunters, Germantown, Philadelphia, PA, 2007
Public History Intern, Johnson House, Germantown, Philadelphia, PA, 2006


P
ROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS                                                                                                                              

American Historical Association
Organization of American Historians
Southern Historical Association
Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture
Society of Historians of the Early American Republic
Pennsylvania Historical Association



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