Spring 2008

HIEU 216

History of Russia Since 1917

Jeffrey Rossman

Julius Caesar

11 Mar 2008


Spring 2008

HIEU 709

Julius Caesar

J. E. Lendon



Spring 2008

HISA 312

Women and Power in Indian History

Richard Barnett



Spring 2008

HIST 902

Advanced Research Seminar

Sophia Rosenfeld



Spring 2008

HIUS 361

'Women in America, 1600 to 1865'

Ann J. Lane



Spring 2008

HIUS 804

'American Revolution, Early Republic, Antebellum Era'

Peter S. Onuf

Western Civilization

11 Mar 2008


Fall 2008

HIEU 201

Western Civilization

This course will introduce and place in perspective the essential features of the human experience in the western world from ancient Mesopotamia to the Reformation. Political and institutional developments, social organization and political ideas, art, architecture, literature, philosophy and religion will all receive attention. Basically, this is the course where you will encounter all those things you have always known you ought to know, and find out why you felt you ought to know them. Readings will be drawn from a course textbook and a series of primary sources ranging from the very earliest literature of ancient Mesopotamia through to the writings of Martin Luther, taking in Homer, the Bible, Cicero, Peter Abelard and Dante along on the way. Reading will average about 125 pages per week.

The courses consists of three lectures and a discussion section each week.

Students will complete three hour-long examinations and write four three to four page papers.

Possible readings:

T.F.X. Noble, et al., Western Civilization. The Continuing Experiment, 3rd edition, Volume 1 (Houghton Mifflin, 2002).

M. Perry, J.R. Peden & T.H. Von Laue, Sources of the Western Tradition, 4th edition (Houghton Mifflin, 1999).

Additional readings will be available online through the course website.



Fall 2008

HIEU 360 / GETR 360

German Jewish History and Culture

, Grossman, Jeffrey

This course provides a wide-ranging exploration of the culture and history of German Jewry from 1750 to 1939. It focuses especially on the Jewish response to modernity in Central Europe, a response that proved highly productive, giving rise to a range of lasting transformations in Jewish life in Europe and later North America, in particular, and in European culture and society, more generally.

Until the mid-eighteenth century, Jewish self-definition was relatively stable. From that point on, it became increasingly contingent and open-ended. Before the rise of Nazism in 1933, German Jewish life was characterized by a plethora of emerging possibilities. This course explores this vibrant and dynamic process of change and self-definition. It traces the emergence of new forms of Jewish experience, and it shows their unfolding in a series of lively and poignant dramas of tradition and transformation, division and integration, dreams and nightmares. The course seeks to grasp this world through the lenses of culture and history, and to explore the different ways in which these disciplines illuminate the past. We will discuss processes of change that began with Jewish emancipation, the entry of Jews into European culture and society, and the acculturation (vs. assimilation) that ensued. These processes released new energies and produced new challenges for Jewish life. These energies led to the invention of the “Wissenschaft des Judentums” (the “science” or “academic study” of Judaism) and to various attempts to re-form traditional Jewish life for a modern world – resulting in the reform, conservative and modern Orthodox movements. These newly released energies also gave rise to the literary salons of Berlin and Vienna, conducted by various independent Jewish women (e.g. Rahel Levin Varnhagen, Henrietta Herz) and serving as centers of German cultural activity. Similarly, individual Jews made important contributions far in excess of their numbers to modern European culture and society – in literature and the press, politics, philosophy, the natural and the social sciences. We will consider contributions by such figures as Marx, Freud, Walter Benjamin, Adorno, Kafka, Heine, Wittgenstein, Rosa Luxembourg, among others, and explore what, if any, relationship their works had to do with their Jewish background. Finally, we will consider the various Jewish responses to modern politics of the left and right in Germany, including socialism, liberalism, the völkisch movements, political anti-Semitism and Zionism.

This course is intended to acquaint students with the study of German Jewish culture and history and assumes no prior training in the subject. Class meetings will combine lecture and discussion. A large share of the reading assignments will come from primary sources – novels, short stories, poems, folktales, diaries, and memoirs. In class we will also examine East European Jewish music and visual arts. Course requirements will include two short essays (5 pages) and a 10-page term paper as well as conscientious participation in class discussion. Readings will be drawn from both primary and secondary literature. Represented in the primary reading will be central figures in German-speaking Jewry, possibly including Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Rahel Varnhagen, Franz Kafka, Bertha Pappenheim, Martin Buber, Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud. The secondary literature may draw from Amos Elon, The Pity of It All, Jacob Katz, Out of the Ghetto; Michael Meyer, ed., German-Jewish History in Modern Times and Michael Brenner, The Jewish Renaissance in Weimer Germany.



Fall 2008

HIST 215

US-Latin American Relations in the 20th Century

At the end of the 19th century most of Latin America was controlled by oligarchy elites, was economically poor, illiterate, and suffered from a vast inferiority complex.  The United States was a far off secondary power.  By the end of the 20th century much had changed, democracy flourished, economic optimism was everywhere, and the United States was a close giant and major economic power.  This course will examine US policies toward and relations with Latin America during the 20th century.  Although it will incorporate Latin American attitudes and views, it will focus primarily on the role the United States played.  The emphasis is on US policy and attitudes and Washington’s response to Latin American developments.  It will illustrate how US policymakers perceived Latin America, American security concerns, the expansion of corporate capitalism, economic development programs, and efforts to contain communist expansion and promote democracy in the hemisphere.  In addition to detailing the impact of World War I and World war II and the Cold war on inter-American relations, the course will examine the use of US military interventions and CIA covert action programs to further US objectives in the hemisphere, especially in Mexico, Haiti, Guatemala, Panama, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Chile, and Nicaragua.  It will also examine cultural efforts and images and changing political ideologies and migration patterns and how these changed over time as Washington policymakers attempted to create and maintain a US dominated hemisphere.

Requirements:  Mid Term Examination  30%; Research Paper  20%;  Final Examination  40%; Course Participation  10% 

Required Reading:

Lars Schoultz, Beneath the United States: A History of US Policy Toward Latin America (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998).
Robert H. Holden and Eric Zolov, eds., Latin America and the United States: A Documentary History (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000). 
Nick Cullather, Secret History: The CIA’s Classified Account of Its Operations in Guatemala, 1952-1954 (Palto Alto, CA: Stanford University press, 1999).

Non-Topical Research

11 Mar 2008


Fall 2008

HIST 999

Non-Topical Research

Staff

Non-topical research, taken after a Ph.D. advisor has been selected (please use advisor's instructor number).  Can be taken for 3,6,9, or 12 hours; is graded S(atisfactory) or U(satisfactory).  Does not count towards the number of courses needed for a degree (a "filler" or "dummy" course).



Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904



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