Scientific Revolution

11 Mar 2008


Fall 2008

HIEU 332

Scientific Revolution

Karen Parshall

This course examines the development of scientific thought and institutions in Western Europe during the critical period from 1450 to 1700 known as the Scientific Revolution.  Because those engaged in scientific pursuits during this period were very consciously reacting to the thought of their predecessors, the course opens with a survey of developments in science from classical Antiquity through the Middle Ages.  With the reintroduction throughout the Renaissance of ancient Greek and Roman texts, scientific thinkers and philosophers both adapted and rejected classical thought in formulating their own interpretations of the phenomena observable in the natural world around them.  As a result of their efforts, "new" versions of "old" sciences emerged, and areas such as astronomy and astrology, chemistry and alchemy, coexisted within the accepted body of scientific knowledge.  Open to all undergraduates, this course---primarily in the history of ideas---requires no prior training in the sciences or in European history.

            Classes will be conducted in a lecture/discussion style.  Students will write one short (5-7-page) paper, a research prospectus and annotated bibliography, and a (12-15-page) research paper, in addition to taking an in-class midterm and a final examination.  (This course satisfies the Second Writing Requirement.)

            Readings will average 100 pages each week and will be drawn from a photocopied packet containing excerpts from the works of such writers as Plato, Aristotle, Ptolemy, Galen, Bacon, Kepler, Paracelsus, Harvey, Galileo, and Newton, as well as from the following required texts:

Debus, Man and Nature in the Renaissance
Descartes, Discourse on Method
Lindberg, The Beginnings of Western Science
Galileo, Sidereus Nuncius


Fall 2008

HILA 404

Independent Study in Latin American History

Staff

In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings.  Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes.  Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.



Fall 2008

HIST 850

War, Colonialism, and Forced Migration in the Modern World

Alon Confino

This research seminar explores the problem of forced mass migration in (especially though not exclusively) the modern era. Focusing on the role of colonialism and war behind forced migration, the course attempts to view the phenomenon in a global perspective, while paying special attention to individual historical cases: central and eastern Europe, 1944-46; the Sub-Indian continent, 1947-49; Palestine in 1947-49. We shall also discuss the cases of the Native Americans and of the forced migration of African slaves into the Americas. The aim is to gather students from diverse fields and departments, geographical areas and periods, for an intense, stimulating exploration of a topic that raises fundamental problems of interpretation, method, and justice. After six weeks of weekly seminar meetings, students will work on their research paper, based on primary sources, in close consultation with me.



Fall 2008

HIUS 323

Rise and Fall of the Slave South

TBA

This course will explore the emergence and destruction of the most powerful slave society of the modern world:  the American South.  It will begin with the sixteenth century and extend through the Civil War and Reconstruction.  We will examine the lives of slaves and slaveowners, small farmers and large planters, men and women, soldiers and civilians.

Requirements include substantial research in primary documents in Alderman Library.  Research topics are broad and require students willing to tackle open-ended assignments.  Readings will be diverse, including original documents, materials on the Web, fiction, and secondary accounts.  Energetic participation in a weekly discussion section is a central part of the course.

History Seminar

11 Mar 2008


Fall 2008

HIUS 401

History Seminar

The Politics and Policies of the Nixon Presidency

The Nixon Presidency (1969-1974) spanned one the most tumultuous periods in recent American history. From Vietnam to racial busing to Watergate, the Nixon Presidency played a central role in the era's most significant struggles. At its center was Richard Nixon, one of the more controversial, polarizing, and influential political figures of the second half of the twentieth century. In this course, we will go inside the Nixon White House to learn more about Nixon and the politics and policies he made. In addition to reading some of the best recent scholarship on the Nixon Presidency, we will engage a rich variety of multimedia and other primary source materials. Most notably, students will gain unparalleled access to the highest levels of the Nixon White House through the use of the Nixon Tapes. Between February 16, 1971, and July 12, 1973, Nixon secretly recorded over 3,700 hours of his meetings and conversations. These recordings offer a singular view into inner workings of the Nixon Presidency and shed new light on the major political, social, and cultural events of the period. The ultimate goal of the course will be to provide students with the tools to produce a 25 page paper based on primary sources on some aspect of the Nixon Presidency.


Spring 2007

HIEA 362

WOMEN AND THE FAMILY IN IMPERIAL CHINA

Cong Ellen Zhang



Spring 2007

HIEU 375

'THE EVOLUTION OF THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM, 1815-1954'

Stephen A. Schuker

INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR

11 Mar 2008


Spring 2007

HIST 100

INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR

False Documents: The History of Believing

Womack



Spring 2007

HIST 897

'NON-TOPICAL RESEARCH, PREPARATION FOR RESEARCH'

Staff



Spring 2007

HIUS 309

THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION

Gary W. Gallagher



Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904



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