Victorian Britain

11 Mar 2008


Fall 2008

HIEU 356

Victorian Britain

Ortolano

This course examines British history between the union with Ireland in 1801 and the death of Queen Victoria in 1901. This period saw the United Kingdom emerge victorious from a generation of warfare against the French Revolution and Napoleon, followed by an Industrial Revolution that propelled its economy and its empire to the forefront of global affairs - leading Britons to think of themselves as Victorians, and historians to label the mid-nineteenth century the "Age of Equipoise." This course situates this familiar narrative within a century of social unrest and political conflict, from the English midlands to Irish Ulster, from South Asia to South Africa, paying particular attention to the causes and content of unrest, as well as to the ways that the governing classes sought to manage it. Topics will include the Industrial Revolution, popular culture and party politics, class society and gender ideology, liberalism and free trade, empire and imperialism, and the contested union with Ireland. Lectures will be supplemented by occasional films, discussions will focus on both primary and secondary texts, and evaluation will be based upon two or three short essays (about 3-4 pages each), one longer essay (about 8 pages), and class participation.

History Seminar

11 Mar 2008


Fall 2008

HISA 401

History Seminar

The Partition of India: Problems and Perspectives

Neeti Nair

The Partition of India has been the defining political misstep in 20th century South Asia, confounding centuries of fluid identities in one sweeping irreversible decision. In this course we examine the texture of life in pre-Partition Punjab, the United Provinces and Bengal; detail the denouement in political negotiations that culminated in Partition; consider the violence that became constitutive of Partition; and mark the enormous consequences of the international boundary line separating India from Pakistan and later, Bangladesh. Films, fiction and a range of primary and secondary sources will be used. A five page proposal will be due for the mid-term. The final essay of 18-20 pages will be a research paper drawing upon a range of primary sources like the Transfer of Power volumes, contemporary newspapers, collections of correspondence, memoirs, Partition literature etc. The following books will be available for purchase at the bookstore:

Ayesha Jalal, The Sole Spokesman: Jinnah, the Muslim League and the demand for Pakistan, Cambridge University Press, [1985], 1994.

Gyanendra Pandey, The Construction of Communalism in Colonial North India, Oxford University Press, [1990], 2006.

Vazira Fazila-Yacoobali Zamindar, The Long Partition and the Making of Modern South Asia: Refugees, Boundaries, Histories, New York: Columbia University Press, 2007

All other chapters from books, journal articles and short pieces of fiction will be made available on toolkit. This research seminar fulfils the second writing requirement. Permission of the instructor is required to register for the course. Prior coursework in South Asian Studies/ History will serve as a prerequisite for this course. The reading load will average 200 pages a week.

Course requirements include active participation in discussions (20%); weekly one-page position papers (20%); a short proposal of 5 pages (10%), the presentation of research (10%) and the final research paper of 18-20 pages (40%).

Independent Research

11 Mar 2008


Fall 2008

HIST 996

Independent Research

Staff

Tutorial or independent study.  Please sign up with the professor's instructor number.



Fall 2008

HIUS 355

History of American Law, 1760-1861

This course considers the historical development of American law from shortly before the American Revolution until the eve of the Civil War.  The course will assist students in tracing the evolution of fundamental political concepts, including sovereignty, freedom, republicanism, and federalism, as they were embodied in legal developments and related political controversies in the new nation.  Students will examine how the growth of a distinctively American legal tradition both reflected and influenced changes in major social and economic institutions such as property rights, slavery, banking, new technology, and the family.  They will analyze the evolving relationship between law and moral principles in this period.  And they will ask how the legal system responded to the emerging threat of civil war.

Students will read extensively in and be expected to discuss in class primary legal sources, including constitutions, court cases, and statutes.  Readings and discussions will also include works on the period’s legal, political and economic history.

Required readings are expected to include the following works (in certain cases only selected portions will be read):

  • Reid, Constitutional History of the American Revolution
  • Amar, The Bill of Rights
  • Horwitz, The Transformation of American Law 1780-1860
  • Hobson, The Great Chief Justice:  John Marshall and the Rule of Law
  • Kutler, Privilege and Creative Destruction:  The Charles River Bridge Case
  • McCurdy, The Anti-Rent Era in New York Law and  Politics 1839-1865
  • Finkelman, Dred Scott v. Sandford
  • McCurdy, Readings in American Legal History, 1760-1860
  • Berlin, Liberty (ed. Hardy).

Additional required course materials will be available on Toolkit or through library databases. Students will be expected to read approximately 150 pages per week. 

N.B. Students are advised that the readings listed above may change before class begins.

There will be two mid-term exams (25% each) and a final exam (40%).  Participation in class discussion sessions will account for 10% of the grade.



Fall 2008

HIUS 404

Independent Study in United States History

Staff

In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings.  Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes.  Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.

INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR

11 Mar 2008


Spring 2007

HIEU 100

INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR

Out of the Ghetto: The Birth of Modern Jewish Politics

James Loeffler



Spring 2007

MSP 480

THE SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL STUDIES

Everett U. Crosby



Spring 2007

HIST 361

'ESPIONAGE, INTELLIGENCE, & POLICY MAKING IN THE 20TH CENTURY'

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

11 Mar 2008


Spring 2007

HIST 996

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

Staff



Spring 2007

HIUS 351

THE DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1900

J.C.A. Stagg



Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904



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